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HUMOR!

A Textbook on ALL Aspects of Humor...

By © Dr. Hilmar Alquiros, The Philippines

Click + enjoy a complete Table of Contents

 

 

I dedicate this work to my beloved wife Lilian 💕

for her humor... to live with me! :-)

Just married for 20 happy years!

 

Where this 1,000 pages book was written... in 3 months! :-)

  

 

 In the grand tapestry of existence, only two phenomena stand as forces potent enough to rival the might of Death: Love and Humor!

 

 This book is a part of a trilogy exploring the profound realms of → Love, → Death, and → Humor, each volume delving into territories that are as complex as they are enriching ventures into an equally complex and enriching territory.

The 'triumphvirate' :-) of works, at the end of my journey, seeks to encapsulate the essence of human experience, portraying humor as a vital counterbalance to the gravity of love and the finality of death.

 

 HUMOR! is not merely an anecdote to our existence or a fleeting phenomenon but a fundamental aspect of our resilience and humanity. It acts as a bridge between the depth of love and the inevitability of death, offering a glimpse into the indomitable spirit of human beings to find joy, our 'Queen Mother of Feelings' in the brightest, and spiritual light in the darkest.

 Through this essay of about 1,000 pages, we celebrate the transformative power of humor to connect, heal, and illuminate the human condition, affirming that in life's Yin and Yang, the human spirit, fortified with love and laughter, remains immortal in dignity.

 

Links to all Chapters + Subchapters!

 


Grant Snider Masterwork!

 

"I find television very educational.
Every time someone turns it on, I go in the other room and read a book." :-)

 

 

When the author - Dr. AwkwArD alias P. Alind, Rome* -

was proven as pregnant with this book! :-)

 

* A hidden and an open palindrome... :-)

   The sources of the cartoons are included in itself or unknown.
 

Table of Contents

0. Introduction

A. Humor in Forms

B. Humor through History

C. Humor across Cultures

D. Science and Sources

E. Pilogue :-)

 

"I love people who make me laugh. I honestly think it's the thing I like most, to laugh.
It cures a multitude of ills. It's probably the most important thing in a person."

Audrey Hepburn

 

  The prize for these ~ 1,000 pages is 100 HIL-Dollars. :-)

 

0. Introduction

"Humor is mankind’s greatest blessing."
Mark Twain

 

 In the deepest humor, the heart outweighs the mind.

 

  

 

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

  0.1.1. Defining Humor

  0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

0.2. Objective and Scope of the Book

0.3. Evolution of Humor

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

0.5. Humor in Science

 

 Do you like humor?! And do you agree to have a lot of humor - as 100% of all your fellow humans do?! :-)

 1 July is celebrated around the world as International Joke Day!

 

 Humor,  this bridge between the head and the heart, including its historical, cultural, psychological and sociological aspects, promises a blend of scholarly insight and playful narrative.

 This book will trace the evolution of humor from ancient times to the digital age, explore its cultural diversity, and examine how it connects us across different cultures. It invites you, dear reader, to reflect on humor's origins, your personal connections to different types of humor, and to its depth, its role in our lives, and its impact on cognition and social interactions.

 Let's view humor as a social mirror and a universal language that brings people together, aiming to unravel the complexities and benefits of humor in our lives!

 

 Welcome to a journey through the universe of humor!

 

"Well my imaginary friend thinks you have serious mental problems..." :-)

 

The Universal Language of Laughter :-)

 

"Join me in discovering how laughter creates bridges,
bringing people together despite their cultural differences."

 

 Gelotology* (Greek γέλως gelos "laughter") is the study of laughter and its effects on the body, from a psychological and physiological perspective. It was first studied by psychiatrists, although some doctors in antiquity recommended laughter as a form of medicine, pioneered by William F. Fry of Stanford University.

 

 Scientific studies demonstrated the effectiveness of laughter* for instance:

Regular naps will prevent old age,
especially if taken whilst driving.

 

  

10 Surprising Health Benefits of Laughter for Seniors**

  1. Laughter Improves Heart Health

  2. Reduces Blood Pressure

  3. Releases Endorphins

  4. Boosts Your Immune System

  5. Can Soothe Tension

  6. Helps Fight Depression

  7. Improves the Memory

  8. Promotes Fitness

  9. Combats Anxiety

  10. Inspires Connection

         ** sources: https://eldercarealliance.org/blog/health-benefits-of-laughter-for-seniors/

                                → O’Shannon, Dan (2012). What Are You Laughing at?
                                      A Comprehensive Guide to the Comedic Event
.
                                      New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic. 272 pp. ISBN 978-1441162939.

 

   Old age is a gift from heaven:

When you’re young, embarrassment is forgetting to zip up your fly.
When you’re old, embarrassment is forgetting to unzip your fly.

 

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

"A well-developed sense of humor is the pole
that adds balance to your steps
as you walk the tightrope of life."

William Arthur Ward

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

  0.1.1. Defining Humor

  0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

0.2. Objective and Scope of the Book

0.3. Evolution of Humor

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

0.5. Humor in Science

 

 Humor is a multifaceted phenomenon that encompasses a wide range of expressions: from verbal wit and physical comedy to subtle irony and sharp satire:

 

0.1.1. Defining Humor

 Defining humor is akin to capturing a rainbow! :-)

 

 Humor is elusive, subjective, and varies dramatically across cultures and individuals:

 

 Here some quotes about humor by famous writers and experts:

 

 

 0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

"Laughter is an instant vacation."
Milton Berle

 

 More than mere entertainment, humor is a vital component of psychological well-being and social interaction:

 

0.2. Objective and Scope of this Book

"To laugh often is the sign of a good mind."
Francois Rabelais

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

  0.1.1. Defining Humor

  0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

0.2. Objective and Scope of the Book

0.3. Evolution of Humor

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

0.5. Humor in Science

 

 This book uniquely blends scholarly analysis with wit and humor, using playful language and metaphors to delve into various forms of humor such as verbal, physical, and situational. While it is academically inclined, the book is designed to be accessible and engaging for a broad audience, including scholars, students, humor enthusiasts, and general readers. Its purpose is to dissect and understand humor in all its forms, exploring its societal and individual impacts. This approach aims to cater to anyone interested in the multifaceted world of humor, making it a comprehensive guide for a wide array of readers.

 

0.3. Evolution of Humor

"The comic is the tragic that has learned to laugh at itself."
Max Frisch

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

  0.1.1. Defining Humor

  0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

0.2. Objective and Scope of the Book

0.3. Evolution of Humor

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

0.5. Humor in Science

 

 "The Time Dimension of Humor!" explores humor's historical evolution, tracing its journey from ancient roots to modern forms. The section highlights how humor has constantly adapted to cultural and technological shifts throughout history. It emphasizes the resilience of certain forms of humor, such as slapstick, puns, and satire, which have adapted to various historical and cultural contexts while maintaining their core essence and appeal. This exploration demonstrates humor's role as a reflection of the ever-changing human society, showcasing its ability to evolve while retaining timeless forms that continue to resonate across ages.

 

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

The humorous story is American,
the comic story is English,
the witty story is French.
The humorous story depends for its effect upon the manner of the telling;
the comic and the witty story upon the matter.

Mark Twain

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

  0.1.1. Defining Humor

  0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

0.2. Objective and Scope of the Book

0.3. Evolution of Humor

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

0.5. Humor in Science

 

 "The Space Dimension of Humor!" examines the global landscape of humor in the chapter "Comedy of Cultures." This section showcases the rich diversity of humor styles, themes, and delivery methods across different cultures. It highlights how humor dynamically adapts to shifting cultural, technological, and societal influences, reflecting the evolving nature of human societies. Despite these cultural variances, certain humor elements are found to be universally relatable, transcending cultural boundaries and connecting people through shared laughter, relief, and social bonding.

 

0.5. Humor in Science

"The most exciting phrase to hear in science,
the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny...'"
Isaac Asimov

 

   Source unknown

 

0.1. The Nature and Importance of Humor

  0.1.1. Defining Humor

  0.1.2. Benefits of Humor

0.2. Objective and Scope of the Book

0.3. Evolution of Humor

0.4. Cultural Diversity of Humor

0.5. Humor in Science

 

 

 

 "Humor in Science" covers the scientific understanding of humor, including various theories explaining humor's psychological underpinnings.
 It delves into the cognitive and emotional aspects of laughter and humor, their impact on mood, stress relief, mental health, and social bonding.
 It also explores the neurology of humor, examining brain responses to humor. Interesting case studies and experiments illustrate humor's functions in health and education.
 We emerge artificial intelligence in humor analysis and its therapeutic potential in mental health treatment.

  After that appetizer, dear reader, let's enjoy the main dish in four courses (A B C D) plus a savory dessert:
 from
A Humor in Forms to E-Pilogue:  Before Midnight(!) I reset my clock to Alphabetical Savings Time! :-)

 

    Source unknown

                 Alphabetical Savings Time!

 

 

A. Humor in Forms

 

Table of Contents

0. Introduction

A. Humor in Forms

B. Humor through History

C. Humor across Cultures

D. Science and Sources

E. Pilogue :-)

 

A.0. Introduction

"Humor is an affirmation of dignity,
a declaration of man's superiority to all that befalls him."

Romain Gary

 

 In "A. Kinds of Humor," the section provides an overview of what makes humor funny, in different forms of humor like puns, satire, slapstick, etc., the role of context in humor, and the psychological effects of laughter.  Special focus is given to how humor varies among individuals and its role as a unifying or divisive force in society, plus mixed forms of humor.

  • Overview: This section can delve into the essence of what makes something funny, exploring theories of humor, its psychological impact, and its universal appeal.

  • Key Topics: Different forms of humor (puns, satire, slapstick, etc.), the role of context in humor, and the psychological effects of laughter.

  • Special Focus: How humor varies among individuals and how it can be both a unifying and divisive force in society.

  • Mixed forms: Of course, there are mixed forms of two or three kinds of humor!

 

A.1. Wordplay

 

"I'm reading a book on anti-gravity. It's impossible to put down!"

"I'm reading a book on humor. It's impossible not to smile!"

 

  

 

A.0. Introduction

A.1. Wordplay

A.2. Situational Humor

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.4. Literature and Poetry

A.3. Physical Humor

A.6. Dark Humor

A.7. Absurd Humor

A.8. Interactive Humor

A.9. Cultural Humor

A.10. Visual Humor

A.11. Music - Symphony of Smiles

A.12. Cabaret, Comedy and Comedians

A.13. Philosophical Humor: A Chuckle with Depth

A.14. Crossover Humor: A Symphony of Laughs

 

  The following examples and categories encapsulate the playful and creative use of language in humor, demonstrating how puns and wordplay can be employed in various contexts to elicit laughter and amusement. Each category offers a unique angle on humor, from the simple play on sounds to the more complex interplay of meanings and contexts.

 

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

 

  Source unknown

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

   A.1.1.1. Homophonic

   A.1.1.2. Homographic

   A.1.1.3. Observational Word Play

   A.1.1.4. Paraprosdokians

   A.1.1.5. Content-Related Examples

   A.1.1.6. Mixed Humor

A.1.2. Double Entendre

A.1.3. Portmanteau

A.1.4. Spoonerism

A.1.5. Malapropism

   A.1.3.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

   A.1.3.2. Backwards Compliment

   A.1.3.3. High-register Word Use

   A.1.3.4. Double Meaning

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

  

 

 "A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes" delves into the artful manipulation of language for comedic effect, highlighting the creativity inherent in puns, wordplay, and linguistic nuances. From Shakespeare's clever use of language in his plays to modern-day humor that plays with the intricacies of words, this section explores how language can be a fertile ground for humor.

 

Source unknown

 

 Shakespeare was a master of incorporating puns and wordplay into his works, such as in "Much Ado About Nothing," "Twelfth Night," and "A Midsummer Night's Dream," where language not only served the plot but also added layers of humor through linguistic creativity.

 

   Source unknown

 

             Source unknown

 

Pun:

  • "Did you hear about the restaurant on the moon? Great food, but no atmosphere." — This pun plays on the double meaning of "atmosphere" to humorous effect, juxtaposing the culinary expectation with the literal absence of air.

  • "Atheism is a non-prophet organization." — A clever play on words that contrasts "prophet" with "profit," using phonetic similarity to create a humorous critique of religious and organizational structures.

 

Play on words:

  • "Why did the bicycle fall over? Because it was two tired!"  This joke creatively uses the phrase "two tired" to connect the concept of exhaustion with the physical reality of a bicycle having two tires.

  • "I'm reading a book about anti-gravity. It's impossible to put down!"
    Here, "impossible to put down" cleverly refers both to the compelling nature of the book and the literal defiance of gravity.

 

Play on groups of words:

  • "I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure."  A statement that amusingly contradicts itself, playing on the theme of indecision.

  • "I told my wife she was drawing her eyebrows too high. She looked surprised." This joke uses a literal description to create a visual pun, linking the act of drawing eyebrows with the expression of surprise.

     

 

A.1.1.1. Homophonic Puns

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

   A.1.1.1. Homophonic

   A.1.1.2. Homographic

   A.1.1.3. Observational Word Play

   A.1.1.4. Paraprosdokians

   A.1.1.3. Content-Related Examples

   A.1.1.6. Mixed Humor

 

 "A.1.1.1. Homophonic Puns" focuses on wordplay that uses phonetic similarities between words with different meanings. Examples include a pun combining the concept of time flying with fruit flies, a play on "be" and "bee," a dentist joke involving different meanings of "floss," and a chemistry joke playing on the word "reaction." These examples demonstrate how homophonic puns create humor by exploiting the dual meanings of words that sound alike.

 

 These play on words that sound the same but have different meanings, often relying on phonetic similarities.

  • "To bee or not to bee, that said the beekeeper"
    Plays on "be" sounding like "bee".

  • "I went to the dentist and he told me I need to floss more. I said, 'You floss?'"
    Plays on "floss" as dental thread and "floss" as to dance awkwardly.

  • "I'd tell you a chemistry joke but I know I wouldn't get a reaction."
    Plays on "reaction" as both a chemical process and a response from the audience.

  • "To write with a broken pencil is pointless." This simple pun plays on "pointless" as both lacking a point (in a literal, physical sense for a pencil) and being futile or without purpose.

  • "Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana."
    This pun cleverly uses the word "flies" in two different contexts: first, to describe the swift passage of time, and second, to refer to the behavior of fruit flies, a type of insect, towards bananas. Additionally, the phrase plays on the double meaning of "fruit flies" as both the action of fruit flying metaphorically and the noun referring to the insects attracted to fruit, creating a humorous juxtaposition and a surprising twist.

          

 

A.1.1.2. Homographic Puns

 

  

 

 

  

 

 Let's explores the humorous use of words that have different meanings but the same pronunciation, often leading to clever and unexpected twists in meaning. Examples include a pun on "clause" relating to Santa's helpers and sentence structure, a play on "moss" as a plant and a descriptor for a person, and a witty use of "case" referring to both a legal scenario and a physical container. These examples highlight the inventive nature of homographic puns, creating humor through the duality of word meanings.

 

 These utilize words with multiple spellings but the same pronunciation.

  • "They say a rolling stone gathers no moss. But what if it's moss rolling?"
    Plays on "moss" both as a plant and as a slow, unproductive person.

  • "The carpenter’s tools were stolen. It was a case of grand larceny."
    A play on "case" as both a legal term and a container for tools.

  • "Santa’s helpers are known as subordinate clauses."
    Puns on the double meaning of "clause" (both Santa's helpers and parts of a sentence).

 

 

A.1.1.3. Observational Word Play

 

 

   here: imgflip.com

 

 Here we delve into humor derived from everyday life observations. It includes puns and jokes that play on common experiences, often using wordplay or literal interpretations to create humor. These jokes often rely on unexpected connections or twists, adding a layer of wit to the observations of daily life. The humor in this category is typically grounded in relatable situations, making it widely accessible and enjoyable.

 

 These involve puns, jokes, or wordplay based on witty observations about everyday life, often relying on unexpected connections or twists.

  • "My brain is like a browser; it has too many tabs open and nothing is getting done."
    The last part highlights the struggle to complete anything due to the mental overload and constant switching between tasks.

  • "Give peas a chance!"
    To parody John Lennon's famous "Give peace a chance," adding humorous absurdity.

  • "I love to talk in metaphors. It's the spice of life!"
    It playfully connects two unrelated ideas ("talking in metaphors" and "spice of life") through the double meaning of "spice" (both flavor and excitement).

  • "I told my doctor I broke my arm in two places. He told me to stop going to those places."
    The humor arises from the literal interpretation of "places" where the injury occurred.

 

A.1.1.4. Paraprosdokians

 

  

 

 

 This is a form of humor where the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected, leading to a reinterpretation of the first part. It includes examples that use ironic situations, unexpected twists, and humorous reinterpretations of common phrases. This style of humor often involves a play on words and clever misdirection, leading to a humorous and unexpected conclusion.

 

 Misdirection: A figure of speech where the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising or unexpected, which causes the reader or listener to reframe or reinterpret the first part.

  • "I bought a self-help book on procrastination. I'll get around to reading it someday."
    It uses humor to acknowledge an ironic situation (buying a book on procrastination but procrastinating on reading it) through a play on words.

  • "I asked the librarian if the library had any books on paranoia. She whispered, 'They're right behind you!'"
    The unexpected twist at the end ("They're right behind you!") reinterprets the initial question and creates humor through surprise.

  • "I'm not sure what's wrong with my vacuum cleaner. It just keeps staring at me."
    Observational: 
    It highlights the absurdity of the situation with a touch of surreal humor. Or to Personification: Attributing human characteristics to an inanimate object ("staring") is the key comedic element here.

  • "I haven’t slept for ten days, because that would be too long."
    The twist reinterprets the initial setup about insomnia into a joke about the duration of sleep.

 

 

A.1.1.5. Content-Related examples

 

 

 This chapter covers humor related to specific themes like food, animals, occupations, and technology. It includes puns, double entendres, and wordplay in these areas. Food-related humor often uses puns involving cooking or eating. Animal humor might involve puns or anthropomorphism. Occupational humor uses wordplay related to various professions. Technology humor often plays on terms related to gadgets and their functionalities. Each category brings a unique flavor to linguistic jokes, drawing on familiar contexts for comedic effect.

 

Food:
 
These involve humor based on puns, double entendres, or other wordplay related to food and cooking.

  • "I used to be a baker, but I couldn't make enough dough."
    Plays on the literal and metaphorical meanings of "dough": money and bread dough.

  • "My therapist told me to take things one day at a time. So I only eat one M&M at a time... then I eat the whole bag."
    Humorous exaggeration involving food with a self-deprecating twist.

 

Animals:

 These involve puns, metaphors, or other wordplay relating to animals and their characteristics.

  • "I told my cat to stop impersonating a flamingo. He had to put his foot down."
    Uses both anthropomorphism and a double entendre based on "foot down": literally and figuratively.

  • "I saw a seagull at the beach and I asked him, 'Can you tell me a joke?' He looked at me and said, 'What do you call a fish with no eyes?' Fsh!'
    Plays on the animal making a pun.

  • "My goldfish died. I guess it's finally kicking the bucket."
    A dark pun using animal idiom with unexpected literal interpretation.

  • "Animals may be our friends. But they won’t pick you up at the airport." (Bobcat Goldthwait)

 

Occupation:
 These hinge on puns, jokes, or wordplay related to specific professions or occupations.

Technology:

 

Old age:

  • Looking 50 is great if you’re 60. ~Joan Rivers

  • Age is a high price to pay for maturity. ~Tom Stoppard

  • Time may be a great healer, but it’s a lousy beautician. ~Author Unknown

  • When I was a kid, the Dead Sea was only sick. ~After George Burns

  • You’re only young once, but you can stay immature indefinitely. ~Ogden Nash

  • Old age isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative. ~Maurice Chevalier

  • You know you’re getting old when you get that one candle on the cake. It’s like, “See if you can blow this out.” ~Jerry Seinfeld

  • Regular naps prevent old age, especially if you take them while driving. ~Author Unknown

  • A stockbroker urged me to buy a stock that would triple its value every year. I told him, ‘“At my age, I don’t even buy green bananas.” ~Claude Pepper

  • He’s so old that when he orders a three-minute egg, they ask for the money upfront. ~George Burns

  • True terror is to wake up one morning and discover that your high school class is running the country. ~Kurt Vonnegut

  • There is no pleasure worth forgoing just for an extra three years in the geriatric ward. ~John Mortimer

  • You can live to be a hundred if you give up all the things that make you want to live to be a hundred. ~Woody Allen

  • As you get older, three things happen. The first is your memory goes, and I can’t remember the other two. ~Sir Norman Wisdom

  • I don’t do alcohol anymore. I can get the same effect just by standing up fast. ~Author Unknown

  • None are so old as those who have outlived enthusiasm. ~Henry David Thoreau

  • Talk about getting old. I was getting dressed, and a peeping tom looked in the window, took a look, and pulled down the shade. ~Joan Rivers 

  • Birthdays are good for you. Statistics show that the people who have the most live the longest. ~Larry Lorenzoni

  • If I’d known I was going to live this long, I’d have taken better care of myself. ~Author Unknown

 

 

A.1.1.6. Mixed Humor 

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

   A.1.1.1. Homophonic

   A.1.1.2. Homographic

   A.1.1.3. Observational Word Play

   A.1.1.4. Paraprosdokians

   A.1.1.5. Content-Related Examples

   A.1.1.6. Mixed Humor

 

  Source unknown

 

 Now we examine the art of combining multiple humor elements in a single pun. This includes blending technical humor with wordplay, irony with absurdity, and creating complex jokes that employ double meanings, irony, and self-deprecating humor. The examples showcase how the fusion of different comedic styles can create layered and sophisticated humor, appealing to a broad range of tastes and preferences.

 

  

 

 The fine art of using two or more humor elements in the same pun:

 

Simple examples:

 

Complex Examples: with 3 and 4 elements:

 

   Source unknown

 

  "I'm on a seafood diet. I see food, and I eat it." 

  • Double meaning:
    This joke plays on the double meaning of "seafood" as both dietary restriction and any food related to the sea. The speaker pretends to follow a specific diet based on seafood, but subverts the expectation by revealing it's actually an excuse to eat anything related to the water.

  • Irony:
    There's also a layer of irony, as a true seafood diet wouldn't include non-seafood items. The speaker intentionally misinterprets the diet for humorous effect.

  • Self-deprecating humor:
    Finally, the joke hints at the speaker's lack of willpower or dietary discipline, making it relatable for anyone who struggles with healthy eating.

 

  "I finally got my head around time travel. It's confusing, but eventually, you get used to it."

  • Humorous Paradox:
    Mastering the mechanics of time travel, and the figurative sense of grasping its broader paradoxes: accepting the confusion as unavoidable,  implying that time travel's mind-bending nature is permanent.

  • Aspects of  Acceptance of complexity:
    time travel may be impossible, yet one can learn to navigate its confusing nature.

  • Irony of self-deception:
    accepting the confusion, even if it's a comforting illusion of understanding
    .

  • Sarcastic commentary:
    on the absurdity of time travel concepts. By "get used to" the confusion, the speaker highlights the inherent ridiculousness of the idea.

 

 

A.1.2. Double Entendre

I don’t normally tell Dad jokes, but when I do, he always laughs.

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

A.1.2. Double Entendre

A.1.3. Portmanteau

A.1.4. Spoonerism

A.1.5. Malapropism

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

 "Double Entendre" explores phrases with two meanings, using wordplay and ambiguity to create humor. These phrases often have a literal interpretation and a more hidden, suggestive meaning. The section showcases various examples, from garden-related humor to occupational wordplay. It highlights the cleverness of language and the joy of uncovering hidden meanings, making double entendres a testament to the playful nature of linguistic humor. This form of humor adds a layer of sophistication and wit, inviting audiences to appreciate the intricacy and inventiveness of language.

 

 Quite typical are phrases with two meanings, one literal and one suggestiveDouble entendres involve phrases that offer two interpretations – one usually straightforward and the other carrying a more hidden, often humorous or suggestive meaning. They often rely on wordplay, including homophones or ambiguous phrasing, to create a dual meaning.

 Double entendres add a layer of sophistication and wit to humor, inviting the audience to enjoy the cleverness of language and the joy of uncovering the hidden meaning. They are a testament to the playful and inventive nature of linguistic humor. Here are some more examples - enjoy them, dear reader! :-)

 

Examples:

  • "Did you see my new shoes? They're knot bad!"
    (
    s. A.1.1.6.) "not" and "knot": instead of saying "not bad," they say "knot bad," playing on the double meaning of "knot" as both a type of shoe closure and a negative term. With misdirection: The initial setup leads the listener to believe the speaker will simply compliment their shoes. However, the unexpected twist with "knot" subverts the expectation and creates humor.

  • "My therapist told me to take things one day at a time. So I only eat one M&M at a time... then I eat the whole bag."
    While being instructed to take things one step at a time, the speaker attempts to follow it literally by eating one M&M at a time, but ultimately succumbs to their desire and devours the entire bag; amplified by the speaker's awareness of their own inability to truly follow the therapist's advice. This self-deprecating humor resonates with listeners who can relate to similar struggles with moderation and discipline.

  • "I'm on a seafood diet. I see food, and I eat it."
    on "seafood" meaning both underwater animals and any food you can see.

  • "I used to be a baker because I kneaded dough."
    This phrase plays on the dual meaning of "kneaded" – both as the process of making bread and the need or requirement for money ("dough" being a slang term for money).

  • "We're having a staff meeting, but it's nothing to stick around for."
    This example uses the word "staff," which can mean both a group of employees and a long stick, creating a pun that adds a playful dimension to a mundane announcement.

 

  • "The new elevator operator has his ups and downs."
    Here, the phrase plays on the literal function of an elevator moving up and down, while also suggesting the operator’s fluctuating moods or fortunes.

  • "She’s an electrician, so she knows how to conduct herself."
    In this example, "conduct" has a double meaning – referring both to electrical conduction and to one's behavior, creating a clever play on words related to the electrician's profession.

  • "This garden is growing on me – especially the mushroom."
    The phrase plays on the double meaning of "growing on me" as both developing a fondness for something and the literal growth of a mushroom in a garden.

  • "Our window repair business is shattering expectations."
    Here, "shattering" is used both in the sense of breaking glass and exceeding (or breaking) expectations, making it a witty commentary on the business’s success.

  • "The butcher is pretty cleaver with his words."
    This example uses a homophone, replacing "clever" with "cleaver" (a tool used by butchers), to create a pun that’s relevant to the butcher’s profession.

 

 Let's analyze a more sophisticated modern stand-up example:

 "I met a time traveler. I asked him about the future. He said it was about time someone did." This joke is a subtle double entendre, where "about time" plays on the theme of time travel and the expression's typical use to mean 'overdue.' It humorously juxtaposes the literal aspect of discussing 'time' with a time traveler and the idiom's conventional usage.

  This 'Reflective Riddle' is a brilliant example of a double entendre involving the concept of time.  A clever play on words that hinges on the multiple meanings of the phrase "about time." The humor arises from the unexpected intersection of the literal meaning with the thematic context of the joke:

 The literal interpretation suggests the time traveler found it appropriate for someone to finally show interest in his knowledge. The play on "time," considering the speaker's time-traveling context, humorously combines the literal meaning with the thematic element of time travel, resulting in a witty twist. This example illustrates how language can be used humorously, especially with topics like time travel that naturally lend themselves to wordplay:

  1. Literal Interpretation:
    In a straightforward sense, "it was about time someone did" suggests that the time traveler felt it was overdue or appropriate for someone to ask about the future. It's as if he was expecting or waiting for this question, and he's acknowledging that finally, someone has shown interest in what he knows about the future.

  2. Play on "Time":
    The humor in this sentence comes from the wordplay involving "
    time." Since the speaker is a time traveler, any reference to "time" carries a double meaning. Here, "about time" doesn't just refer to the appropriateness of the timing of the question but also plays on the concept of time travel. It's a pun that combines the literal meaning of "about time" with the thematic element of time travel, creating a humorous twist.

 

 

A.1.3. Portmanteau

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

A.1.2. Double Entendre

A.1.3. Portmanteau

A.1.4. Spoonerism

A.1.5. Malapropism

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

 Here we discuss words created by blending two existing words to form new terms. These portmanteaus often encapsulate complex concepts or trends in a concise and witty manner. Examples include "brunch," "frenemy," "guesstimate," "infomercial," and "mockumentary." Each example reflects the blend of different concepts or functionalities, demonstrating the inventiveness and evolution of language in capturing new ideas or cultural phenomena.

 

 Words created by blending existing words: Portmanteaus combine parts of multiple words to create new terms that encapsulate complex concepts or trends in a concise and often witty manner. They are particularly popular in modern language as a way to describe new ideas or cultural phenomena.

 

 

 Each of these examples illustrates how portmanteaus can succinctly and cleverly combine concepts, often adding a layer of humor or novelty. They are a testament to the playful and evolving nature of language, reflecting cultural trends, technological advancements, and societal changes.

 

 

A.1.4. Spoonerism

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

A.1.2. Double Entendre

A.1.3. Portmanteau

A.1.4. Spoonerism

A.1.5. Malapropism

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

 "Spoonerism" covers the humorous switching of initial sounds in words or phrases, often leading to amusing and whimsical outcomes. It involves swapping consonants or sounds, creating an unexpected twist in meaning. Examples range from simple mix-ups like "shake a tower" instead of "take a shower," to more complex narrative spoonerisms in stories or jokes. These playful linguistic switches often result in a humorous reinterpretation of familiar phrases or concepts, highlighting the creativity and fun inherent in language.

 

 Playful switching of initial sounds of words. Play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched between two words in a phrase.
 Spoonerisms typically involve swapping the initial consonants or sounds of two words. For example, "best seat" becomes "set beast." The switch usually happens at the very beginning of the words, rather than involving entire syllables.

 The key to a spoonerism is that the swap creates a humorous or whimsical effect due to the unexpected change in sound, which often leads to a change in meaning as well. This wordplay focuses on the initial sounds, creating a playful twist on familiar phrases or words. Spoonerism often are One-Liners!

 

Examples:

Jingle Spoonerism:
 Humorous form of Miscommunication:

 

Narrative Spoonerisms

 Longer stories or jokes where many of the words are humorously transposed.

 

 

A.1.5. Malapropism

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

A.1.2. Double Entendre

A.1.3. Portmanteau

A.1.4. Spoonerism

A.1.5. Malapropism

   A.1.5.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

   A.1.5.2. Backwards Compliment

   A.1.5.3. High-register Word Use

   A.1.5.4. Double Meaning

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

 "Malapropism and Related Humor" explores various forms of humor arising from the use of incorrect words or phrases, often leading to amusing misunderstandings. It includes malapropisms, misunderstood metaphors, humorous similes, backwards compliments, high-register word use, and double meanings. Each category plays on language in a unique way, using wordplay, irony, and sophisticated vocabulary to create humor. These forms often involve clever reinterpretations of phrases or the use of ambiguous language to achieve a comedic effect.

 

 Using the wrong word in a sentence for humor.

 

A.1.5.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.5. Malapropism

   A.1.5.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

   A.1.5.2. Backwards Compliment

   A.1.5.3. High-register Word Use

   A.1.5.4. Double Meaning

 

 Misunderstood: the recipient takes the simile literally or interprets it differently than intended, leading to humor.

 Humorous simile: a comparison meant to be humorous, often exaggerated or absurd.

 

 

A.1.5.2. Backwards Compliment

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.5. Malapropism

   A.1.5.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

   A.1.5.2. Backwards Compliment

   A.1.5.3. High-register Word Use

   A.1.5.4. Double Meaning

 

 Praising indirectly: disguising criticism as praise by highlighting negative aspects in a seemingly positive way, often combined with ironic elements (the intended meaning contradicts the literal words, creating humorous dissonance).

 

  NOT(!) a real Backwards Compliment is this Anagram Wordplay:

 

    Source unknown

 

 

A.1.5.3. High-register Word Use

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.5. Malapropism

   A.1.5.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

   A.1.5.2. Backwards Compliment

   A.1.5.3. High-register Word Use

   A.1.5.4. Double Meaning

 

 Using sophisticated vocabulary in a humorous context.

 

A.1.5.4. Double Meaning

 

  Source unknown

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.5. Malapropism

   A.1.5.1. Misunderstood Metaphor & Humorous Simile

   A.1.5.2. Backwards Compliment

   A.1.5.3. High-register Word Use

   A.1.5.4. Double Meaning

 

 Words or phrases with two possible meanings can lead to humorous misunderstandings or clever wordplay. This form of humor often relies on the audience recognizing both meanings for the full comedic effect to land.

 

 

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

A.1. Wordplay

A.1.1. Linguistic Jokes

A.1.2. Double Entendre

A.1.3. Portmanteau

A.1.4. Spoonerism

A.1.5. Malapropism

A.1.6. Oxymoron

 

"What is a free gift? Aren’t all gifts free?"

 

 "Oxymoron" means the juxtaposition of contradictory ideas in phrases. It covers classic oxymorons that combine familiar opposing concepts, witty oxymorons with clever wordplay, and figurative oxymorons expressing complex emotions or ideas. These oxymorons often involve a playful or thought-provoking contrast of terms, highlighting the complexity and versatility of language.

 

 Juxtaposition of contradictory ideas.

 

Classic Oxymorons:

 These are well-known oxymorons that have been used for centuries and are easily recognizable. They often combine very familiar opposing concepts.

 

 

Witty Oxymorons:

 These are clever and playful oxymorons that utilize wordplay or unexpected juxtapositions to create humor or surprise. They often involve less common word pairings.

 

 

Figurative Oxymorons:

 These oxymorons go beyond literal meanings and use language figuratively to express complex emotions or ideas. They often involve metaphors, similes, or personification.

 

 

 Hidden in often used formulations:

   "What is a free gift? Aren’t all gifts free?" Emphasizing the humorous observation on the unnecessary qualifiers in language.

 

 

A.2. Situational Humor

 

A.0. Introduction

A.1. Wordplay

A.2. Situational Humor

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.4. Literature and Poetry

A.5. Physical Humor

A.6. Dark Humor

A.7. Absurd Humor

A.8. Interactive Humor

A.9. Cultural Humor

A.10. Visual Humor

A.11. Music - Symphony of Smiles

A.12. Cabaret, Comedy and Comedians

A.13. Philosophical Humor: A Chuckle with Depth

A.14. Crossover Humor: A Symphony of Laughs

 

 

A.2.1. Situational Irony

 

   Source unknown

                        Undo the knot! :-)

 

 "Situational Irony" delves into humor arising from unexpected contrasts between expected outcomes and actual events. Examples include a teacher unintentionally plagiarizing during a lecture on plagiarism, a computer misinterpreting a user's request for a break, and a traffic cop getting a license suspension for unpaid tickets. Each example demonstrates the comedic effect of situations turning out contrary to what's anticipated, highlighting the unpredictability and amusement in everyday scenarios.

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.1. Situational Irony

A.2.2. Anti-climax

A.2.3. Misunderstanding

A.2.4. Absurdity

A.2.5. Slapstick

A.2.6. Clowns

A.2.7. Mishap

A.2.8. Cultural Misunderstanding

A.2.9. Everyday Situations

A.2.10. Witty Observation

 

 Each category captures a unique aspect of humor, providing a rich tapestry of how comedy can be employed in various contexts. Examples for each category aptly illustrate how these different forms of humor work, offering a wide range of comedic styles from the subtle to the overtly hilarious.

 This type is characterized by a stark contrast between what is expected to happen and what actually occurs, often leading to unexpected and humorous outcomes.

 When the outcome of a situation is the opposite of what is expected or intended. When the audience knows the potential consequences of a character's actions, while the character remains oblivious.

 

 

A.2.2. Anticlimax

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.2. Anti-climax

 

"Anticlimax" means humor arising from a significant buildup that concludes with a mundane or underwhelming outcome. This type of humor plays on the contrast between heightened expectations and the reality of a disappointing finish, creating a comedic effect through the unexpected drop from excitement to banality. Examples include a much-anticipated reveal turning out to be something ordinary, like a sock drawer, or a well-prepared presentation being thwarted by technical issues. The humor lies in the gap between what is eagerly expected and what actually happens.

 

 Disappointing FinishThe essence of anti-climax is building up significant anticipation, only to end in a mundane or underwhelming outcome, often leading to humor through the contrast between expectation and reality.

Expectation: The build-up suggests something significant or exciting will be revealed, perhaps a hidden treasure or secret passage.

Anticlimax: The actual "big reveal" is a mundane and underwhelming object – a sock drawer. This sudden shift from high anticipation to a banal reality creates humor through disappointment.

Expectation: The speaker, having perfected their presentation, anticipates a successful and impactful delivery.

Anti-climax: Technical problems hinder the presentation, potentially spoiling the planned delivery and frustrating the speaker's efforts. This sudden obstacle creates a disconnect between expectation and execution, leading to an anti-climactic moment.

 

 

A.2.3. Misunderstanding

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.3. Misunderstanding

 

 "Misunderstanding" focuses on humor arising from communication breakdowns, often involving literal interpretations, misinterpretations, or missing the intended meaning of language. These misunderstandings create comedic situations that highlight human error and the amusing aspects of flawed communication. Examples range from misinterpreting scientific facts for humor to mistaking strangers for celebrities, and from mishearing song lyrics to using foreign language phrases inappropriately. This type of humor showcases the endearing and laughable imperfections in everyday human interactions.

 

 Comical Confusion: Misunderstandings, whether intentional or accidental, can lead to humorous situations. These often involve taking things literally, misinterpreting language, or missing the intended meaning, resulting in comedic scenarios that highlight human error and the amusing side of communication breakdowns.

 Misunderstandings in humor often reflect the delicate and sometimes flawed nature of human communication, which can result in situations that are as endearing as they are laughable. They remind us of our own imperfections in a light-hearted way, allowing us to laugh at the silliness of everyday life.

 

 

A.2.4. Absurdity

 My grandfather is hard of hearing. He needs to read lips.
I don’t mind him reading lips,
but he uses one of those yellow highlighters.

Brian Kiley

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.4. Absurdity

 

 "Absurdity" examines humor derived from illogical or nonsensical scenarios that defy reason and common sense. This form of humor creates laughter through unpredictability and the juxtaposition of the ordinary with the bizarre, highlighting the comedic value in the absurd. Examples include wearing unconventional items as clothing, attempting futile tasks, and engaging in irrational behavior. Absurd humor celebrates the joy in unexpected and outlandish situations.

 

 Comical Confusion: Absurdity involves situations, statements, or actions that defy reason or common sense, leading to humor through their sheer unpredictability and deviation from normal expectations. This form of humor tickles the funny bone by juxtaposing the ordinary with the nonsensical, creating a landscape where the rules of logic do not apply.

 Absurd humor allows us to explore the limits of our understanding and find joy in the unexpected and the strange. It's a celebration of the imagination’s power to subvert the everyday and turn the mundane into a source of endless amusement.

 

 

A.2.5. Slapstick

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.5. Slapstick

 

 Let's explore the humor style characterized by exaggerated physical actions and mishaps. Rooted in the Italian Commedia dell'arte, slapstick involves visual gags, often without dialogue. Classic performers like Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton exemplified this style, which continues in modern entertainment through films like "Home Alone" and "The Hangover" series. Slapstick's universal appeal lies in its playful, exaggerated portrayal of physical comedy and human clumsiness.

 

 Physical Folly: Slapstick humor is an art form that revels in exaggerated, boisterous actions and slapstick comedy, often involving accidents and physical mishaps. This style of humor is universally communicative, relying on visual gags and physicality rather than dialogue.

 Someone slipping on a banana peel. This classic comedy bit, while simple, leverages the suddenness and the slapstick staple of a fall to elicit a quick laugh. The humor is visual and doesn't rely on dialogue, making it universally understood and appreciated. The image of someone slipping on a banana peel captures the essence of slapstick: it's a universally recognizable piece of physical comedy that plays on timing and the suddenness of the fall.

 Slapstick's charm lies in its ability to make us laugh at the misadventures and misfortunes of others in a harmless and exaggerated fashion. It is a form of comedy that reminds us of the joy of play and the humor in human clumsiness.

 

 

A.2.6. Clowns

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.6. Clowns

 

 Here we discuss clowns' role in comedy, known for their vivid makeup and outlandish costumes. The section traces their evolution from traditional circuses to modern performances, highlighting key figures and techniques in clowning. Clowns use physical comedy, props, and exaggerated actions to entertain, with their cultural impact varying across different societies. This exploration reflects clowning as both a comedic art form and a performance art, showcasing its rich history and diverse applications.

 

Clown Antics:

 Clowns, recognized by their vivid makeup and outlandish costumes, have a storied tradition of bringing laughter through physical comedy and exaggerated actions. Their performances, filled with pratfalls, mock conflicts, and a range of slapstick humor, have been a staple of circuses and entertainment for centuries.

 A clown tripping over their own oversized shoes is a classic example of clown humor, playing on the physical comedy that is central to the clowning tradition.

 The rich tapestry of clown history, techniques, and their cultural significance, sheds light on the multifaceted nature of clowning as both a form of comedy and a performing art.

 

 

A.2.7. Mishap

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.7. Mishap

 

 "Mishap" examines the humor found in unforeseen and often embarrassing events. These mishaps, though inconvenient at the moment, often become amusing stories over time, resonating due to their universality and the human capacity to find humor in errors. From kitchen disasters to hair-dyeing gone wrong, mishaps connect us through shared experiences of unintended consequences. The section also discusses the role of timing in both the occurrence and recounting of these incidents, enhancing their comedic appeal.

 

 Humorous Accidents: Mishaps, in their essence, are those unforeseen events that carry an intrinsic humor due to their sheer unexpectedness and the human capacity to find levity in error. These incidents, though perhaps inconvenient or embarrassing when they occur, often transform into amusing anecdotes over time.

 An incident like accidentally dyeing one's hair green instead of blue: this becomes a humorous situation and a comical tale, especially when enough time has passed to allow for a light-hearted perspective on the blunder.

 Setting the oven on fire while trying to bake cookies: the mishap of setting the oven on fire while attempting to bake cookies might initially induce panic, but later it becomes a staple story of one's culinary adventures—or misadventures.

 Examining the humorous side of mishaps highlights the lighter aspects of human error and the shared joy found in the collective experience of life's unexpected turns.

 

 

A.2.8. Cultural Misunderstanding

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.8. Cultural Misunderstanding

 

  Source unknown

 

  "Cultural Misunderstanding" discusses humor emerging from the meeting of different cultural norms, language nuances, and expectations. This type of humor thrives on misinterpretations and misunderstandings that cross cultural boundaries. Examples include humorous incidents from language translations and cultural practices, such as a traveler encountering amusing translations or an American businessman navigating greeting customs in Japan. These situations underscore our common humanity and the universal language of humor in bridging cultural gaps.

 

Cross-Cultural Humor:

 Understanding and laughter often go hand in hand, and nowhere is this more evident than in the realm of cross-cultural humor. This type of humor emerges from the intersection of diverse cultural norms, language nuances, and the array of human expectations. It thrives on the varied interpretations that arise from these differences, often leading to comical misinterpretations and delightful misunderstandings that transcend language barriers and cultural boundaries.

This clash of perspectives creates humor:

 Through unintentional and unexpected meaning.

 Consider the tale of a traveler in Beijing... who, upon checking into their hotel, was handed a brochure promising an experience where "Our wines leave you nothing to hope for." This peculiar phrase, meant to assure guests of unparalleled quality, ironically flips in translation to suggest a lack of anything desirable—a charming blunder that elicits chuckles from English-speaking guests.

 These instances of cultural misunderstanding serve as gentle reminders of our diverse world. They encourage us to look at our customs from an outsider's perspective, often leading to moments of shared laughter that highlight our common humanity. Through humor, we find a universal language that helps bridge the gap between cultures, fostering understanding and connection in the most delightful ways.

 

 

A.2.9. Everyday Situations

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.9. Everyday Situations

 

 "Everyday Situations" explores humor derived from ordinary life. It involves keen observation of mundane events, revealing their inherent absurdity, irony, or quirkiness. The comedy in everyday humor is relatable, stemming from familiar scenarios in settings like workplaces or family gatherings. It often includes observational humor and can serve as subtle social commentary, reflecting societal norms and behaviors. This type of humor resonates widely as it articulates shared human experiences.

 

 Relatable Humor: Finding humor in everyday life hinges on the keen observation of the mundane, often unveiling the absurdity, irony, or unexpected quirks of daily experiences. The comedy arises from recognizing the humor in familiar, everyday occurrences and the shared experiences of ordinary life.

 "Yesterday, I saw a guy spill all his Scrabble letters on the road. I asked him, 'What’s the word on the street?'"

 This joke turns an ordinary mishap into a pun, connecting the literal image of letters on the street with the idiomatic expression about popular news or rumors.

 The question "What's the word on the street?" juxtaposes a common phrase against an unusual yet mundane event, creating a surprising and humorous twist that is instantly relatable.

 

 

A.2.10. Witty Observation

 

   Source unknown

 

A.2. Situational Humor

A.2.10. Witty Observation

 

                Source unknown

 

 "Witty Observation" means humor arising from sharp, insightful comments on life, people, and situations. It often involves clever wordplay or a twist on common phrases, offering humor that's both intelligent and relatable. Examples range from humorous takes on dieting to perceptive comments on parenting, social situations, and technological advancements. This type of humor captivates through its blend of wit and observation, providing amusing yet thoughtful perspectives on everyday experiences.

 

 Insightful Humor: Witty observations involve clever remarks about life, people, or situations, often incorporating wordplay or a twist on common phrases to create humor that is both intelligent and relatable. Humor relies on clever and insightful observations about life and human behavior. It often involves wordplay, puns, or unexpected twists on familiar expressions.

 These examples of witty observations showcase how humor can stem from sharp, perceptive comments on various aspects of life, from the mundane to the complex, providing a clever and often humorous reflection of our world.

 

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

"The task of comics is to elicit laughs as directly and as fast as possible.
They generally do this most effectively when ensuring
they keep within the mental competence of the typical audience member."

Prof. Robin Dunbar

 

A.0. Introduction

A.1. Wordplay

A.2. Situational Humor

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.4. Literature and Poetry

A.5. Physical Humor

A.6. Dark Humor

A.7. Absurd Humor

A.8. Interactive Humor

A.9. Cultural Humor

A.10. Visual Humor

A.11. Music - Symphony of Smiles

A.12. Cabaret, Comedy and Comedians

A.13. Philosophical Humor: A Chuckle with Depth

A.14. Crossover Humor: A Symphony of Laughs

 

 "Verbal Humor" explores humor that arises from wordplay and unexpected linguistic turns, often manifested in one-liners or short jokes. It demonstrates how various techniques like wordplay, irony, and juxtaposition can be effectively used in verbal humor. The humor often comes from a surprising twist or the literal interpretation of a figurative statement. These techniques, combined with relatable themes, create a rich landscape of comedic expression where language is playfully manipulated for humor.

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.1. Punchline Jokes

   A.3.1.2. Anecdotal Jokes

   A.3.1.3. One-Liners

   A.3.1.4. Word Play Jokes

   A.3.1.5. Dark Jokes

   A.3.1.6. Absurdist and Nonsensical Jokes

   A.3.1.7. Political and Social Commentary Jokes

   A.3.1.8. Thematic Jokes

A.3.2. Sarcasm

A.3.3. Deadpan (Dry Humor)

A.3.4. Exaggeration + Hyperbole

A.3.5. Understatement

A.3.6. Simile

A.3.7. Metaphor

A.3.8. Self-deprecation

A.3.9. Rhyme and Meter

A.3.10. Dramatic Irony

A.3.11. Verbal Irony

A.3.12. Paraprosdokian

 

 Simple wordplay and unexpected turns, often as One-liner or Short Joke, can create effective verbal humor, especially when combined with relatable themes and clever delivery. The humor in this one-liner comes from a combination of several techniques:

 The following subtypes and examples further illustrate the breadth and depth of verbal humor techniques, showcasing how wordplay, irony, exaggeration, and other linguistic tools can be employed for comedic effect. Each example offers a glimpse into the rich and varied world of humor, where language is not just a tool for communication but a playground for wit and creativity!

 

 This joke is used as motto of this book:

 "I told my wife she should embrace her mistakes. She gave me a hug." :-) :-) :-)

  • Unexpected Turn:
    The speaker starts with a seemingly positive and supportive statement, encouraging their wife to embrace her mistakes. The listener might anticipate words of comfort or acceptance.

  • Wordplay:
    The punch line relies on the double meaning of
     "embrace." While the speaker likely intended it figuratively, as accepting and learning from past errors, the wife interprets it literally, resulting in a physical hug.

  • Juxtaposition:
    The humor emerges from the unexpected shift between the expected advice and the wife's literal interpretation. This juxtaposition creates a surprising and funny scene.

  • Relatability:
    The situation, though exaggerated, taps into the potential for misunderstandings and misinterpretations in communication, especially within relationships. This allows the listener to connect with the joke on a personal level.

 

 The humor can be further enhanced by the tone of delivery, facial expressions, and body language. A deadpan delivery or a surprised reaction to the hug can add an extra layer of amusement!

 

 

A.3.1. Jokes!

"A joke is a tiny revolution."
George Orwell

"The last man that makes a joke owns it."
Finley Peter Dunne

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.1. Punchline Jokes

   A.3.1.2. Anecdotal Jokes

   A.3.1.3. One-Liners

   A.3.1.4. Word Play Jokes

   A.3.1.5. Dark Jokes

   A.3.1.6. Absurdist and Nonsensical Jokes

   A.3.1.7. Political and Social Commentary Jokes

   A.3.1.8. Thematic Jokes

   A.3.1.9. Mathematical Jokes

   A.3.1.10. Science Jokes

 

 "Jokes!" delves into various subtypes of jokes, showcasing the diverse range of humor that can be expressed through short, witty stories or sayings. From punchline jokes and anecdotal tales to one-liners and wordplay, each subtype offers its unique comedic flavor. The section also covers dark humor, absurdist jokes, and those with political or social commentary, highlighting how jokes can entertain and provoke thought across different themes.

 Jokes use a blend of puns, wordplay, and playful scenarios to create a quick laugh, and are great examples of simple, effective humor

 

a. Short, funny stories or sayings. Examples:

b. Animal Wordplay:

c. Tech Humor:

d. Classic Misunderstanding:

 

  So many simple forms of jokes (wordplays, puns) start with a question like what, why etc. - here some more "appetizers", before we explore the higher forms!

 They can take the form of a statement or contain a genuine question.

Statements:

When I said that I cleaned my room, I just meant I made a path from the doorway to my bed.

When I was a kid, I thought Sunday School was where you learned to make ice cream.

When it is a question of money, everybody is of the same religion.

When life gives you melons, you might be dyslexic.

 

Where there’s a will, there’s a relative.

 

Questions:

What did the daughter corn ask the mother corn? - Where’s popcorn?

What did the fish say when it hit the wall? - Dam!

What did the monkey say when he found a banana in his cereal? - A-peeling!

What did the ocean say to the sailboat? - Nothing, it just waved!

What did the tree say to autumn? - Leaf me alone!

What do you call a bear with no teeth? - A gummy bear!

What do you call a cow with no legs? - Ground beef.

What do you call a reindeer with no eyes? -  No eye deer.

What does a painter do when he gets cold? - Puts on another coat.

What did the snowman say to the customer? - Have an ice day!

What’s the difference between a snowman and a snowwoman? - Snowballs!

 

Why did the chicken go to the séance? - To get to the other side.

Why did the octopus beat the shark in a fight? - Because it was well-armed!

Why do bees hum? - They can’t remember the lyrics!

Why don’t oysters share their pearls? - Because they’re shellfish.

 

 Even questions without an answer are possible:
Why do they use sterilized needles for death by lethal injection?

 

 And last but not least:
Why are married women heavier than single women? -
Single women come home, see what’s in the fridge and go to bed,
married women see what’s in bed and go to the fridge.

 

Research:

1)  Prof. Robert Dunbar et.al., Oxford University, Anthropologist, about the cognitive mechanisms underlying laughter and humor. In: "Human Nature". Research with 63 of 100 so-called "funniest jokes of all time": ("The research team found that the funniest jokes are those that involve two characters and up to five back-and-forth levels of intentionality between the comedian and the audience.")

Researchers at Oxford University, led by Prof. Dunbar, told a bunch of jokes to some volunteers and asked them to rate each one, here the Top Ten:

 

Snail with an attitude

 A guy is sitting at home when he hears a knock at the door. He opens the door and sees a snail on the porch. He picks up the snail and throws it as far as he can. Three years later there’s a knock on the door. He opens it and sees the same snail. The snail says: ‘What the hell was that all about?’

 

A genie and an idiot

 Three guys stranded on a desert island find a magic lantern containing a genie, who grants them each one wish. The first guy wishes he was off the island and back home. The second guy wishes the same. The third guy says: ‘I’m lonely. I wish my friends were back here.’

 

True love lasts forever

 It’s the World Cup Final, and a man makes his way to his seat right next to the pitch. He sits down, noticing that the seat next to him is empty. He leans over and asks his neighbor  if someone will be sitting there. ‘No,’ says the neighbor. ‘The seat is empty.’ ‘This is incredible,’ said the man. ‘Who in their right mind would have a seat like this for the Final and not use it?’ The neighbor says, ‘Well actually the seat belongs to me. I was supposed to come with my wife, but she passed away. This is the first World Cup Final we haven’t been to together since we got married.’ ‘Oh, I’m so sorry to hear that. That’s terrible….But couldn’t you find someone else, a friend, relative or even a neighbor  to take her seat?’ The man shakes his head. ‘No,’ he says. ‘They’re all at the funeral.’

 

Off to work

 A guy shows up late for work. The boss yells, ‘You should’ve been here at 8.30!’ He replies. ‘Why? What happened at 8.30?

Oooh Heaven is a place on earth

 Sid and Irv are business partners. They make a deal that whichever one dies first will contact the living one from the afterlife. So Irv dies. Sid doesn’t hear from him for about a year, figures there is no afterlife. Then one day he gets a call. It’s Irv. ‘So there is an afterlife! What’s it like?’ Sid asks. ‘Well, I sleep very late. I get up, have a big breakfast. Then I have sex, lots of sex. Then I go back to sleep, but I get up for lunch, have a big lunch. Have some more sex, take a nap. Huge dinner. More sex. Go to sleep and wake up the next day.’ ‘Oh, my God,’ says Sid. ‘So that’s what heaven is like?’ ‘Oh no,’ says Irv. ‘I’m not in heaven. I’m a bear in Yellowstone Park.’

 

The Devil’s in the details

 A guy dies and is sent to hell. Satan meets him, shows him doors to three rooms, and says he must choose one to spend eternity in. In the first room, people are standing in dirt up to their necks. The guy says, ‘No, let me see the next room.’ In the second room, people are standing in dirt up to their noses

Guy says no again. Finally Satan opens the third room. People are standing with dirt up to their knees, drinking coffee and dating pastries. The guy says, ‘I pick this room.’ Satan says Ok and starts to leave, and the guy wades in and starts pouring some coffee. On the way out Satan yells, ‘OK, coffee

 

Kid vs barber

 A young boy enters a barber shop and the barber whispers to his customer. ‘This is the dumbest kid in the world. Watch while I prove it you.’ The barber puts a dollar bill in one hand and two quarters in the other, then calls the boy over and asks, ‘Which do you want, son?’ The boy takes the quarters and leaves. ‘What did I tell you?’ said the barber. ‘That kid never learns!’ Later, when the customer leaves, he sees the same young boy coming out of the ice cream store. ‘Hey, son! May I ask you a question? Why did you take the quarters instead of the dollar bill?’ The boy licked his cone and replied, ‘Because the day I take the dollar, the game is over!’

 

You’re one in a million

 China has a population of a billion people. One billion. That means even if you’re a one in a million kind of guy, there are still a thousand others exactly like you.

 

Racing a bear

 Two campers are walking through the woods when a huge brown bear suddenly appears in the clearing about 30 feet in front of them. The bear sees the campers and begins to head toward them. The first guy drops his backpack, digs out a pair of sneakers, and frantically begins to put them on. The second guy says, ‘What are you doing? Sneakers won’t help you outrun that bear.’ ‘I don’t need to outrun the bear,’ the first guy says. ‘I just need to outrun you.’

 

All in a night’s work

 A guy meets a sex worker in a bar. She says, ‘This is your lucky night. I’ve got a special game for you. I’ll do absolutely anything you want for £300 as long as you can say it in three words.’ The guy replies, ‘Hey, why not?’ He pulls his wallet out of his pocket and lays £300 on the bar, and says slowly. ‘Paint…my house.’

 

 

Lit.: Dunbar, R.I.M., Launay, J. & Curry, O. The Complexity of Jokes Is Limited by Cognitive Constraints on Mentalizing. Hum Nat 27, 130–140 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s12110-013-9231-6.

Abstract: Although laughter is probably of deep evolutionary origin, the telling of jokes, being language-based, is likely to be of more recent origin within the human lineage. In language-based communication, speaker and listener are engaged in a process of mutually understanding each other’s intentions (mindstates), with a conversation minimally requiring three orders of intentionality. Mentalizing is cognitively more demanding than non-mentalizing cognition, and there is a well-attested limit at five orders in the levels of intentionality at which normal adult humans can work. Verbal jokes commonly involve commentary on the mindstates of third parties, and each such mindstate adds an additional level of intentionality and its corresponding cognitive load. We determined the number of mentalizing levels in a sample of jokes told by well-known professional comedians and show that most jokes involve either three or five orders of intentionality on the part of the comedian, depending on whether or not the joke involves other individuals’ mindstates. Within this limit there is a positive correlation between increasing levels of intentionality and subjective ratings of how funny the jokes are. The quality of jokes appears to peak when they include five or six levels of intentionality, which suggests that audiences appreciate higher mentalizing complexity whilst working within their natural cognitive constraints.

 

 

2) Steinberg, D. (1999) "100 Funniest Jokes of All Time" (Jokes and actually, One-liners!). Ranking with thousands of evaluators...  Selected Items:

 

 Three guys, stranded on a desert island, find a magic lantern containing a genie, who grants them each one wish. The first guy wishes he was off the island and back home. The second guy wishes the same. The third guy says "I’m lonely. I wish my friends were back here."

 

 A guy is sitting at home when he hears a knock at the door. He opens the door and sees a snail on the porch. He picks up the snail and throws it as far as he can. Three years later, there’s a knock on the door. He opens it and sees the same snail. The snail says "What the hell was that all about?"

 

 A guy shows up late for work. The boss yells "You should have been here at 8:30!" he replies: "Why? What happened at 8:30?"

 

 My wife and I took out life insurance policies on each other -- so now it's just a waiting game. (Bill Dwyer)

 

 I was coming back from Canada, driving through Customs, and the guy asked, "Do you have any firearms with you?" I said: "What do you need?" (Steven Wright)

 

 A guy tells his psychiatrist: "It was terrible. I was away on business, and I emailed my wife that I’d be back a day early. I rushed home from the airport and found her in bed with my best friend. I don’t get it. How could she do this to me?" "Well," says the psychiatrist. "Maybe she didn’t see the email."

 

 Last night I went to a 24-hour grocery. When I got there, the guy was locking the front door. I said, "Hey, the sign says you're open 24 hours." He goes: "Not in a row!" (Steven Wright)

 

 I went to the psychiatrist, and he says "You're crazy." I tell him I want a second opinion. He says, "Okay, you're ugly too!" (Rodney Dangerfield)

 

 A lady at a party goes up to Winston Churchill and tells him, "Sir, you are drunk." Churchill replies, "Madam, you are ugly. In the morning, I shall be sober."

 

 I was so ugly when I was born, the doctor slapped my mother. (Henny Youngman)

 

 After 12 years of therapy my psychiatrist said something that brought tears to my eyes.. He said, "No hablo ingles." (Ronnie Shakes) ["I do not speak English"]

 

 A father is explaining ethics to his son, who is about to go into business. "Suppose a woman comes in and orders a hundred dollars worth of material. You wrap it up, and you give it to her. She pays you with a $100 bill. But as she goes out the door you realize she’s given you two $100 bills. Now, here’s where the ethics come in: should you or should you not tell your partner?" (Henny Youngman)

 

 At a White House party, a woman approached Calvin Coolidge, famed for his silence, and said "Mr. President, I made a bet I can get more than two words out of you." He replied: "You lose."

 

 A guy asks a lawyer what his fee is. "I charge $30 for three questions," the lawyer says. "That’s awfully steep, isn’t it?" the guy asks. "Yes," the lawyer replies, "Now what’s your final question?"

 

 When I went to college, my parents threw a going away party for me, according to the letter. (Emo Philips)

 

 I went to a restaurant with a sign that said they served breakfast at any time. So I ordered French toast during the Renaissance. (Steven Wright)

 

 I would never want to belong to any club that would have someone like me for member. (Groucho Marx)

 

 Jack Benny is walking down the street, when a stick-up man pulls out a gun and says "Your money or your life!" An extremely long silence follows. "Your money or your life!" the thug repeats. Finally Benny says "I’m thinking!"

 

 "If this is coffee, please bring me some tea. If this is tea, please bring me some coffee" (Abraham Lincoln)

 

 I was thrown out of NYU. On my metaphysics final, they caught me cheating. I looked within the soul of the boy sitting next to me. (Woody Allen)

 

 Animals may be our friends. But they won’t pick you up at the airport. (Bobcat Goldthwait)

 

 My grandfather is hard of hearing. He needs to read lips. I don’t mind him reading lips, but he uses one of those yellow highlighters. (Brian Kiley)

 

 Two old actors are sitting on a bench. One says: "How long has it been since you had a job?" The other actor says "Thirty two years -- how about you?" The first actor says, "That's nothing. I haven't had a job in forty years!" The other says, "One of these days we've got to get out of this business!"

 

 Two old ladies are in a restaurant. One complains, "You know, the food here is just terrible." The other shakes her head and adds, "And such small portions." (Woody Allen)

 

 L.A. is so celebrity-conscious, there's a restaurant that only serves Jack Nicholson -- and when he shows up, they tell him there'll be a ten-minute wait. (Bill Maher)

 

Your favorites, dear reader?!

 

 

A.3.1.1. Punchline Jokes

"I went to the psychiatrist, and he says 'You're crazy.'
 I told him I want a second opinion.
He says, 'Okay, you're ugly too!'"

Rodney Dangerfield

 

 

 Classic format with a setup and punchline. They typically follow a more traditional setup-and-punchline format.

 They often involve a short story or scenario that builds up to a surprising or humorous conclusion. The setup is crucial and is designed to lead the audience in one direction before the punchline takes them somewhere unexpected, eliciting laughter. The humor often relies on the contrast between the setup and the punchline.

  • "I'm on a whiskey diet. I've lost three days already." -

  • "I told my wife she was drawing her eyebrows too high. She looked surprised."

  • "Why don't skeletons fight each other? They don't have the guts."

  • "I used to be addicted to soap, but I'm clean now."

  • "I told my computer I needed some space. It said 'No problem' and showed me the recycle bin."

  • "My friend says to me, 'What rhymes with orange?' I said, 'No it doesn’t.'"

  • "I'm reading a book on the history of glue. I just can't seem to put it down."

  • "Why do we tell actors to 'break a leg?' Because every play has a cast."

 

A.3.1.2. Anecdotal Jokes

"When I went to college, my parents threw a going away party for me,
according to the letter."

Emo Philips

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.2. Anecdotal Jokes

 

 Anecdotal jokes are essentially short stories or vignettes that culminate in a humorous revelation. They typically involve a setup that builds anticipation through a narrative, leading to an unexpected punchline that subverts the listener's expectations. These jokes are often grounded in personal experiences or societal observations, making them relatable and reflective of the human condition. Through their narratives, anecdotal jokes can convey complex ideas and critiques of social norms, all while entertaining the audience with a good laugh.

  • "I asked the librarian if the library had any books on paranoia. She whispered, 'They're right behind you!'"

  • "During a bank robbery, the robber's mask slips. He asks a hostage, 'Did you see me?' The hostage says, 'Yes', so the robber shoots him. He then asks another hostage, 'Did you see me?' The hostage responds, 'No, but my wife did!'"

  • "At the dentist, I was getting a filling, and I asked, 'This is safe, right?' He said, 'Well, nobody's died yet.'"

  • "I told my therapist I keep hearing voices. He told me I don't have a therapist."

  • "Went to the zoo and saw a baguette in a cage. The zookeeper said it was bread in captivity."

  • "I bought my friend an elephant for his room. He said, 'Thanks.' I said, 'Don't mention it.'"

 

A.3.1.3. One-Liners

"I told my wife she should embrace her mistakes.
She gave me a hug."

Of course, my conscience is clear.
It’s never been used.

Am I ignorant and apathetic?
I don’t know and I don’t care.

I was having short-term memory problems, so I went to see my doctor.
He wanted payment in advance.

Should women be allowed to have children after 40?
Well, it’s their choice but 40 seems more than enough children to me.

6:30 is the best time on a clock,
hands down.

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.3. One-Liners

 

   Two Giants of One-liners!

    Sources unknown

                      Brian Kiley                                        Milton Jones

 Short, quick, witty remark: they are characterized by their brevity and the ability to deliver the humor in a single sentence. They don't require a setup in the traditional sense; the humor is immediate, relying on wordplay, puns, or a quick observation that is funny in and of itself. One-liners are often used for their efficiency in delivering humor quickly and are a staple of stand-up comedians who aim to keep the laughter rolling with rapid-fire jokes.

  • "I told my computer I needed a break, and now it won't stop sending me Kit-Kat ads."

  • "I decided to sell my vacuum cleaner—it was just gathering dust!"

  • "I have a joke about time travel, but you didn't like it."

  • "I'm great at multitasking. I can waste time, be unproductive, and procrastinate all at once."

  • "I'd tell you a chemistry joke, but I know I wouldn't get a reaction."

  • "I'm not lazy; I'm on energy-saving mode."

  • "My wallet is like an onion; opening it makes me cry."

  • "A clear conscience is usually the sign of a bad memory."

  • "I have a few jokes about unemployed people, but none of them work."

 One-liner is a formal feature, the most are content-related features, they can combined. Here are three one-liners from old master Groucho Marx to illustrate this:

  • "I was married by a judge. I should have asked for a jury." (+ Situational, + Word Play)

  • "She got her looks from her father. He’s a plastic surgeon." (+ Word Play, + Societal Commentary)

  • "Getting older is no problem. You just have to live long enough." (+ Philosophical + Observational Humor)

 Famous from a modern master - Steven Wright:

  • "Light travels faster than sound. This is why some people appear bright until they speak." In his video he uses mostly "higher" satirical, paradox, absurd elements etc.

 

A.3.1.4. Word Play Jokes

I saw a robbery in an Apple Store. Does that make me an iWitness?

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.4. Word Play Jokes

 

 Puns, malapropisms, and other forms of linguistic humor. they are focusing on puns, malapropisms, and linguistic humor, the examples you've chosen are perfect illustrations of how language can be twisted for comedic effect. Word play jokes delight in the multiple meanings of words or similar sounding words to create humorous or unexpected outcomes. They are accessible forms of humor that require a bit of intellectual engagement, making them enjoyable for a wide audience.

  • "I changed my iPod's name to Titanic. It's syncing now." 

  • "I used to play piano by ear, but now I use my hands."

  • "I'd tell you a chemistry joke but I know I wouldn't get a reaction."

  • "A book just fell on my head. I only have my shelf to blame."

  • "I don’t trust stairs because they’re always up to something."

  • "I broke my arm in two places. My doctor told me to stop going to those places."

  • "Why do we never tell secrets on a farm? Because the potatoes have eyes and the corn has ears."

  • "Why was the computer cold? It left its Windows open."

  • "I'm trying to organize a hide and seek contest, but it's hard to find good players..."

  • "I used to be a baker, but I couldn't make enough dough."

 

   Source unknown

 

A.3.1.5. Dark Jokes

"My wife and I took out life insurance policies on each other -- so now it's just a waiting game."
Bill Dwyer

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.5. Dark Jokes

 

    Source: Reymolds, ID dren117, Cartoonstock.com

 

 Dark humor serves as a defiant laughter in the cavernous face of mortality, existential dread, and the absurdities of life. It navigates the delicate line between the taboo and the tragic, inviting audiences into a provocative yet hilariously unsettling exploration of themes often left untouched. Through the lens of wit and levity, dark jokes offer a unique perspective on death, tragedy, and the myriad misfortunes that life unfurls, wrapping these somber realities in a comedic package that is as cathartic as it is entertaining.

 This brand of humor does more than just make light of dark situations; it delves deep into the human condition, transforming taboo into satire and tragedy into a source of laughter. By laughing in the face of despair, dark humor offers a mechanism to cope with life's inevitabilities, providing not only a temporary respite from sorrow but also a means to confront uncomfortable truths. It invites us to find humor in our fears and anxieties, to see the absurdity in the grim, and to keep marching with a smirk in the face of life’s ceaseless challenges.

 Through dark jokes, we're reminded that even in the darkest moments, a spark of humor can illuminate the shadows, offering solace and a reminder of the resilience of the human spirit. It's a testament to our ability to find lightness in the dark, to transform pain into pleasure, and to laugh, defiantly and unapologetically, at the absurdity of our existence.

  • "The graveyard looks overcrowded. People must be dying to get in."

  • "My wife and I were happy for twenty years. Then we met."

  • "I have a stepladder because my real ladder left when I was just a kid."

  • "I told my therapist about my fear of being forgotten. He said, 'Don't worry, it won't last long.'"

  • "I’m not saying I hate you, but I would unplug your life support to charge my phone."

  • "War does not determine who is right – only who is left."

  • "I'm a fan of cremation. It's my last chance for a smoking hot body."

  • "Life is a lot like a pencil without an eraser. Eventually, you’re bound to make a permanent mistake."

  • "They say you are what you eat. I don’t remember eating a huge disappointment."

  • "If at first you don’t succeed, then skydiving definitely isn’t for you."

 

 

A.3.1.6. Absurdist and Nonsensical Jokes

 

"After 12 years of therapy my psychiatrist said something that brought tears to my eyes...
He said, 'No hablo ingles.'"
['I do not speak English']
Ronnie Shakes

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.6. Absurdist and Nonsensical Jokes

 

Source unknown

 

 Absurdist humor thrives in the space where logic takes a back seat, and the nonsensical reigns supreme. It's a playground for the imagination, where the rules of the natural world can be bent, twisted, or completely disregarded. This type of humor often relies on bizarre scenarios, illogical sequences, and surreal themes that defy explanation. In the absurd, the punchlines often don't punch; they float away, leaving a trail of giggles and bewildered smiles.

 Nonsensical jokes, similarly, are humor distilled to its most whimsical essence. They often don't follow a narrative or aim to make a point; instead, they celebrate the joy of the unexpected and the delightfully illogical. These jokes might not always make sense in a traditional way, but they speak to the inner child in us that still marvels at the ridiculous and the fantastical.

 In a world that often takes itself too seriously, absurdist and nonsensical humor serves as a reminder of the playful absurdity at the heart of the human experience. It's a chance to step outside the bounds of reality and into a world where anything can happen, and often does—to hilarious effect.

 

I went to my doctor to see why I had such an excessive fear of snakes.
He said I have a reptile dysfunction.

 

  • "Why don’t scientists trust atoms? Because they make up everything!"

  • "Parallel lines have so much in common. It’s a shame they’ll never meet."

  • "I plan to open a new restaurant called 'Karma.' There’s no menu; you get what you deserve."

  • "A termite walks into the bar and asks, 'Is the bar tender here?'"

  • "I wanted to learn how to juggle, but I just don't have the balls to do it."

  • "I told my suitcase there will be no vacation this year. Now I’m dealing with emotional baggage."

  • "A limbo champion walks into a bar... and gets disqualified."

  • "I’m writing a book on helicopters. I’m having trouble with the introduction, but I’m sure it’ll take off soon."

  • "A magician was walking down the street and turned into a grocery store."

  • "I’m friends with 23 letters of the alphabet. I don’t know Y."

  • "I used to have a job collecting leaves. I was raking it in."

  • "The rotation of the earth really makes my day."

 

A.3.1.7. Political and Social Commentary Jokes

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.7. Political and Social Commentary Jokes

 

 Humor has long been a sharp tool in the shed of political and social commentary. Jokes in this vein are not just about a quick laugh; they're a form of satire that holds a mirror up to society, reflecting the ironies, paradoxes, and absurdities of our times. Political and social commentary jokes are cleverly disguised critiques, packed with wit and often an undercurrent of truth that can provoke thought as much as they entertain.

 These jokes can serve as a barometer of public sentiment, skewering politicians, policies, and societal quirks with equal fervor. They highlight the discrepancies between what is said and what is done, revealing the often stark contrast between public image and private action. Such humor can bridge the gap between the governed and the governors, providing comic relief while also underscoring deeper issues within the political landscape.

  • "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly, and applying the wrong remedies." -

  • "In democracy, it’s your vote that counts. In feudalism, it’s your count that votes."

  • "I asked my North Korean friend how it was there. He said he couldn't complain."

  • "In democracy, it’s your vote that counts. In feudalism, it’s your count that votes."

  • "Everything is recyclable. Just ask any politician repeating their promises."

  • "A political gaffe is when a politician accidentally tells the truth."

  • "My favorite mythical creature? The honest politician."

  • "Political promises are like babies: easy to make, hard to deliver."

  • "Inflation is when you pay fifteen dollars for the ten-dollar haircut you used to get for five dollars when you had hair."

  • "They say that money talks, but all mine ever says is 'goodbye.'"

  • "I love how in horror movies, the person yells out 'Hello?' As if the bad guy is gonna say 'Yeah, I'm in the kitchen, want a sandwich?'"

  • "Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason."

  • "If the opposite of pro is con, then isn't the opposite of progress Congress?"

 

A.3.1.8. Thematic Jokes

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.8. Thematic Jokes

 

 Many subtypes related to form or content exist: 

They represent many types of humor in general in a mostly short form, theses general forms are also subtypes in other chapters in this book to differentiate other forms of humor. Various jokes focusing on specific themes, offering a rich blend of humor such as professional jokes (doctors, lawyers), family-related jokes (mother-in-law, husband-wife), and cultural or regional jokes.

 Special contents are given in → "Joke cycles" (Bar, Blonde, Lightbulb, Little rabbit, Three wishes etc. - s. Wikipedia!

 

  • Animal Jokes:
    Jokes featuring animals, often playing on their characteristics or behaviors.
    "What do you call an alligator in a vest? An investigator!"

  • Character-Based Jokes:
    Focusing on jokes that center around traditional or stereotypical characters or archetypes.

    "Why don't we play poker in the jungle? Too many cheetahs."

  • Cultural or Regional Jokes:
    Humor derived from specific cultural or regional traits or stereotypes.
    "Why do the French like to eat snails? Because they don't like fast food!"

  • Everyday Life Jokes:
    Jokes that revolve around common situations in
    daily life, offering relatable humor.
    "I would tell you a roof joke, but it's over your head."

  • Family-Related Jokes:
    Humor centered on family dynamics and relationships.
    "I told my wife she was drawing her eyebrows too high. She looked surprised."

  • Food-Related Jokes:
    Jokes that are themed around food, cooking, or eating habits.
    "Did you hear about the Italian chef who died? He pasta way."

  • Historical and Political Jokes:
    Humor that involves historical or political themes.

    "I asked my North Korean friend how it was there, he said he couldn't complain."

  • Knock-Knock Jokes:
    A call-and-response type joke format that often involves puns.

    "Knock, knock. Who’s there? Lettuce. Lettuce who? Lettuce in, it’s cold out here!"

  • Music and Arts Jokes:
    Jokes related to the world of music, art, and performance.

    "What do you get when you drop a piano down a mine shaft? A flat minor."

  • Observational Humor:
    Jokes based on everyday life and common experiences, highlighting the humor in mundane situatio
    ns.
    "Why don't some couples go to the gym? Because some relationships don't work out!"

  • Professional Jokes:
    Jokes about various professions, often poking fun at job-related stereotypes.
    "Why don't scientists trust atoms? Because they make up everything!"

  • Sports Jokes:
    Jokes about athletes, sports teams, or the world of sports in general.
    "Why do basketball players love donuts? Because they can dunk them!"

  • Technology and Science Jokes:
    Humor related to technological advancements, scientific concepts, or nerdy interests.

    "Why was the computer cold? It left its Windows open."

 

 

A.3.1.9. Mathematical Jokes

 

  Chromosomes?! :-)

 

"Mathematics may be defined as the subject
in which we never know what we are talking about,
nor whether what we are saying is true”

- Bertrand Russell,
1925

 

 

 

 

 

 Mathematical jokes are a form of humor on aspects of mathematics or a stereotype of mathematicians, e.g. from a pun, or from a double meaning of a mathematical term, or from a lay person's misunderstanding of a mathematical concept.

 Mathematician John Allen Paulos in his book Mathematics and Humor described several ways that mathematics, generally considered a dry, formal activity, overlaps with humor: both are forms of "intellectual play"; both with "logic, pattern, rules, structure"; and "economical and explicit".

 'Esoteric jokes' rely on the intrinsic knowledge of mathematics and its terminology, 'exoteric jokes' are intelligible to the outsiders, many compare mathematicians with other scientists or common people.

 Mathematics and jokes can be combined to entertain and/or teach math!

 

 

 

Second non-technical meaning

 Some jokes use a mathematical term with a second non-technical meaning as the punchline of a joke:

  • "What's purple and commutes?"
    "An 'Abelian grape'". (A pun on Abelian group.)

  • When Noah sends his animals to go forth and multiply,
    a pair of snakes replies "We can't multiply, we're adders"
    so Noah builds them a log table(!).

 

Double meaning from a direct calculation

 Other jokes create a double meaning from a direct calculation involving facetious variable names, such as this retold from Gravity's Rainbow:

  • "What's the integral of  1/ cabin with respect to cabin?" - "A log cabin."
    - "No, a houseboat; you forgot to add the C"
    [sea!].
     

  • "There are only 10 types of people in the world: those who understand binary, and those who don't."
    (10 is 2 in the binary system)
     This joke subverts the trope of phrases that begin with "there are two types of people in the world..." and relies on an ambiguous meaning of the expression 10, which in the binary numeral system is equal to the decimal number 2. There are many alternative versions of the joke, such as "There are two types of people in this world. Those who can extrapolate from incomplete information."
     

  • "Why do mathematicians confuse Halloween and Christmas?"  -  31 Oct = 25 Dec
    The play on words lies in the similarity of the abbreviation for October/Octal and December/Decimal, and the coincidence that both equal the same amount (318=2510).

Imaginary number i

 Some jokes are based on imaginary number i, treating it as if it is a real number:

   

 

Stereotypes of mathematicians

 Some jokes are based on stereotypes of mathematicians tending to think in complicated, abstract terms, causing them to lose touch with the "real world".

 These compare mathematicians to physicists, engineers, or the "soft" sciences in a form similar to "an Englishman, an Irishman and a Scotsman...", showing the other scientists doing something practical, while the mathematician proposes a theoretically valid but physically nonsensical solution.

   Source unknown

 

Generalizations

 Mathematicians are also shown as averse to making hasty generalizations from a small amount of data, even if some form of generalization seems plausible:

 

"Dictionary of Definitions of Terms Commonly Used in Math Lectures":

 

Non-mathematician's math

 This category of jokes comprises those that exploit common misunderstandings of mathematics, or the expectation that most people have only a basic mathematical education, if any.

 The joke is that the employee fails to understand the scientist's implication of the uncertainty in the age of the fossil and uses false precision.

 

Mock mathematics & mathematical reasoning

 A form of mathematical humor comes from using mathematical tools (both abstract symbols and physical objects such as calculators) in various ways which transgress their intended scope. These constructions are generally devoid of any substantial mathematical content, besides some basic arithmetic.

 

 

More examples: anomalous cancellation is a kind of arithmetic procedural error that gives a numerically correct answer:

 

 

 

 A set of jokes applies mathematical reasoning to situations where it is not entirely valid. Many are based on a combination of well-known quotes and basic logical constructs such as syllogisms:

 

 "Turning a symbol is not so simple..." :-)

 

 

Some jokes attempt a seemingly plausible, but in fact impossible, mathematical operation:

 To reverse the digits of a number's decimal expansion, we have to start at the last digit and work backwards. However, that is not possible if the expansion never ends, which is true in the case of  π and e.

 

Humorous numbers:

 Not only 69(!), but many more, e.g.:

    31₈ = 25₁₀    Halloween = Christmas! :-) Source unknown

  Oct 31: the octal (base 8) number 31, converted to decimal, is 25. Dec 25  for Decimal 25... equal!

 

Math limericks:

  A.3.9. Rhyme and Meter

 

 

Calculation jokes:

 

  Humorously inappropriate use of numbers on a sign in New Cuyama, California

 

   

Sources unknown

 Volume and mass of a cylindrical pizza of radius z, height a and density eir

 

 

 

   

   Mathematical joke playing on the Pythagorean theorem and imaginary numbers

 

 

  Rebus for "I ate some pie."

 

   :-)

→ Main source

 → 13 Jokes That Every Math Geek Will Find Hilarious

 

For higher level math jokes:

 

     Velocity Acceleration ?!

              Sources unknown

 

Q: Why did the chicken cross the road? A: Erdös: It was forced to do so by the chicken-hole principle.

 This joke references the famous Hungarian mathematician Paul Erdös and plays on the concept of the pigeonhole principle (often humorously referred to as the "chicken-hole principle" here), which in its simplest form states that if 'n items are put into m containers, with n>m, then at least one container must contain more than one item.'

 

Q: Why did the chicken cross the road? A: Riemann: The answer appears in Dirichlet’s lectures.

 Both Bernhard Riemann and Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet were influential mathematicians. The joke humorously suggests that the answer to why the chicken crossed the road can be found in Dirichlet's lectures, which Riemann attended.

 

 

 

    HAPPY FUNNY YEAR

 

 

 

Q: Why did the chicken cross the road? A: Fermat: It did not fit on the margin on this side.

 This references the famous anecdote about mathematician Pierre de Fermat, who purportedly wrote in the margin of a book that he had a proof for what is now known as Fermat's Last Theorem, but the margin was too small to contain it.

→ Paul Renteln and Alan Dundes (2004-12-08)."Foolproof: A Sampling of Mathematical Folk Humor" (PDF)Notices of the AMS52 (1).

 

 

 "What American President, with cities in California and Utah named after him, is associated in France and Germany with ?" - "Milliard Fillmore"

 This joke is a play on words involving Millard Fillmore, the 13th President of the United States, and the word "milliard," which is used in some languages to denote the number we call a billion in English (1,000,000,000). (→  J. vos Post, pers. comm., Apr. 27, 2006).

 

 

Strange Loop:

 A strange loop is a phenomenon in which, whenever movement is made upwards or downwards through the levels of some hierarchical system, the system unexpectedly arrives back where it started. Hofstadter (1989). His first example:

 Canon 5 from Bach's Musical Offering (sometimes known as Bach's endlessly rising canon) is a musical piece that continues to rise in key, modulating through the entire chromatic scale until it ends in the same key in which it began. This is the first example cited by Hofstadter (1989) as a strange loop.

Mathematical Humor – from Mathworld

 

 

 

A.3.1.10. Science Jokes

When you’re courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second.
When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour.
That’s relativity.
Albert Einstein

 

A.3.1. Jokes

   A.3.1.10. Science Jokes

 

50% of all doctors graduated in the bottom half of their class.

Why is alcohol a perfect solvent: It can dissolve marriages, families and careers.

Adam and Eve were the first to ignore the Apple terms and conditions.

Breaking News: The man who created Autocorrect has died.

I don’t make mistakes. I make prophecies which immediately turn out to be wrong.

 

 

 

 

Ig Nobel Prize

 The Ig Nobel Prize is a satiric prize awarded annually since 1991 to celebrate ten unusual or trivial achievements in scientific research. Its aim is to "honor achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think." The name of the award is a pun on the Nobel Prize, which it parodies, and on the word ignoble.

 Organized by the scientific humor magazine Annals of Improbable Research (AIR), the Ig Nobel Prizes are presented by Nobel laureates in a ceremony at the Sanders Theater at Harvard University, and are followed by the winners' public lectures at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Source

 

The Journal of Irreproducible Results

The Journal of Irreproducible Results is a magazine of science humor. It was established in Israel in 1955 by virologist Alexander Kohn and physicist Harry J. Lipkin, who wanted a humor magazine about science, for scientists. It contains a mix of jokes, satire of scientific practice, science cartoons, and discussion of funny but real research.

It has passed through several hands and as of 2015 is published in San Mateo, California.

Source

   Source unknown

 

Parody Science

Source

 

I doubt, therefore I might be.

I’d tell you a chemistry joke but I know I wouldn’t get a reaction.

No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking.

Parallel lines have so much in common. It’s a shame they’ll never meet.

Support bacteria. They’re the only culture some people have.

The rotation of the Earth made my day.

Three conspiracy theorists walk into a bar. You can’t tell me that’s a coincidence.

To the mathematician who thought of the idea of zero, thanks for nothing.

Why did the mushroom go to the party? Because he was a fungi!

Moses had the first tablet connected to the cloud.

 

 

Jokes

 

 

Source

 

Source

 

 

A.3.2. Sarcasm

I believed in evolution until I met you.

I am busy right now, can I ignore you some other time?

If ignorance is bliss, then you must be the happiest person on the planet.

Sorry, buddy but I don’t have the energy to pretend to like you today.

I understand what you’re saying, but if I agreed with you, then we’d both be wrong.

Everyone’s entitled to act stupid once in a while, but you’re abusing the privilege.

Mirrors don’t lie, and lucky for you, they don’t laugh either.

I don’t know what your problem is, but I’m guessing it’s hard to pronounce.

Stupidity’s not a crime, so you’re free to go.

If ignorance is bliss, then you must be the happiest person on the planet.

Sorry, buddy but I don’t have the energy to pretend to like you today.

I understand what you’re saying, but if I agreed with you, then we’d both be wrong.

Everyone’s entitled to act stupid once in a while, but you’re abusing the privilege.

Mirrors don’t lie, and lucky for you, they don’t laugh either.

I’m busy; you’re ugly. Have a nice day.

 

  Source unknown

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.1. Jokes

A.3.2. Sarcasm

A.3.3. Deadpan (Dry Humor)

A.3.4. Exaggeration + Hyperbole

A.3.5. Understatement

A.3.6. Simile

A.3.7. Metaphor

A.3.8. Self-deprecation

A.3.9. Rhyme and Meter

A.3.10. Dramatic Irony

A.3.11. Verbal Irony

A.3.12. Paraprosdokian

 

     Source unknown

 

 

 "Sarcasm" discusses the use of irony and wit in saying the opposite of what is meant, often humorously. Sarcasm can convey irritation, humor, or critique, and comes in various forms such as deadpan, self-deprecating, biting, playful, and hyperbolic. The section highlights how sarcasm adds subtlety and sharpness to humor, showcasing its effectiveness in different contexts.

 

Men ought to find the difference between saltiness and bitterness.
Certainly, he that hath a satirical vein,
as he maketh others afraid of his wit,
so he had need be afraid of others’ memory.

Francis Bacon

 

 Saying the opposite of what you mean, often for humor. Sarcasm often involves saying the opposite of what is meant, using irony to convey humor, irritation, or critique. These instances demonstrate the subtlety and wit that sarcasm can bring to humorous expressions.

 

Examples:

Subtypes:

 ...and many more! :-)

 In the world of comedy, several stand-up comedians are renowned for their mastery of sarcasm and wit. Some of these notable figures include:

 

A.3.3. Deadpan (Dry Humor)

 

  Source unknown

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.3. Deadpan (Dry Humor)

 

 "Deadpan (Dry Humor)" focuses on humor delivered in an impassive, emotionless style, often paired with absurd or ironic content. This form of humor relies on the contrast between the deadpan delivery and the unexpectedness of the joke or observation. It's exemplified by comedians like Buster Keaton, known for stoic delivery in chaotic scenes. Deadpan humor often underscores life's absurdities by presenting them without typical emotional responses, inviting audiences to engage with the wit independently.

 

 Deadpan (or Dry Humor): This form of humor thrives on a delivery that is impassive and emotionless, often juxtaposed with absurd or ironic content that creates a comedic contrast. The humor lies in the unexpectedness of the joke or observation, delivered in a tone that is seemingly indifferent to the humor itself. A true master of this style, like Buster Keaton, is known for his stoic, expressionless delivery amidst chaotic and often physically demanding scenes is a testament to the skill involved in this comedic technique.

 Deadpan humor often highlights the absurdity of life's situations by presenting them without the emotional response they would typically elicit. This style of humor can be particularly effective because it invites the audience to recognize the incongruity and engage with the underlying wit on their own terms.

 

 

A.3.4. Exaggeration + Hyperbole

 

   Source unknown

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.4. Exaggeration + Hyperbole

 

 "Exaggeration + Hyperbole" covers the use of extreme overstatement in humor. This technique involves amplifying situations or traits to absurd levels for comedic effect. Examples include hyperbolic expressions of hunger, tiredness, or reactions to everyday scenarios. Subtypes include exaggerated personal traits, situational responses, comparisons, consequences, and specific themes like weather or technology. This form of humor effectively adds playfulness and relatability to comedic expressions.

 

 Deliberate overstatement for comedic effect. "It's so cold outside, I saw a polar bear buying a jacke."

 The essence of exaggeration in humor: taking a familiar situation and amplifying it to absurd proportions for comedic effect. "If I had a dollar for every time I failed at cooking, I'd be able to hire a personal chef!"

 The use of hyperbole as an extreme form of exaggeration in humor is a common and effective technique, as it allows for a playful exploration of everyday scenarios, making them more entertaining and relatable.

 

Examples:

Subtypes:

 A Hyperbole is an extreme Form of exaggeration.

 

 

A.3.5. Understatement

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.5. Understatement

 

 "Understatement" explores humor derived from minimally stating or downplaying situations. This comedic style contrasts the actual significance of an event, achievement, or circumstance with a casual or trivial comment. Examples include understating personal achievements, reactions to chaotic events, or the severity of situations. This form of humor creates a comic contrast by juxtaposing the reality with the understated comment.

 

 Deliberate understatement of the truth for humorMinimalizing situations can create a comedic effect.

 

Examples:

Subtypes:

 

 

A.3.6. Simile

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.6. Simile

 

 "Simile" discusses the use of similes in humor, where comparisons are made using "like" or "as" to create funny or vivid images. This technique compares two different things for comedic effect, often highlighting incongruity or exaggeration. Subtypes include absurd, contrasting, exaggerated, visual, and whimsical comparisons, each adding a unique flavor to the humor.

 

 Comparison between two things using "like" or "as."

 

Examples:

Subtypes:

 

A.3.7. Metaphor

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.7. Metaphor

 

 "Metaphor" discusses how humor can be created through metaphors, which compare two things implicitly. By linking seemingly unrelated concepts, metaphors can offer clever insights or surprising connections, adding depth to humor. Examples include comparing a lawyer to a shark to highlight aggressiveness or using the phrase "life is a box of chocolates" to imply life's unpredictability. Metaphors in humor engage the audience, making the humor not only laughable but also memorable and thought-provoking.

 

 Comparison between two things implying they are the same. A metaphor is a figure of speech that describes an object or action in a way that isn’t literally true but helps explain an idea or make a comparison. Humor can be found in metaphors by linking two seemingly unrelated things in a way that surprises or delights with its cleverness or insight.

 "Life is a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get."

 Popularized by the film "Forrest Gump,", in which Tom Hanks plays the title character: a film, released in 1994, is known for its blend of drama and comedy, as well as its touching portrayal of Forrest, a man with a low IQ but a kind heart and an extraordinary life.

 This metaphor draws a parallel between the assortment of chocolates, where each piece is a surprise, and life's unpredictability. The charm of this metaphor lies in its simplicity and relatability, encouraging a light-hearted approach to the unknowns of life.

 

 The metaphor adds a layer of depth to humor by inviting the audience to engage with the comparison and appreciate the underlying message. It’s a tool that can make humor not just laughable, but also memorable and thought-provoking.

 

 

A.3.8. Self-deprecation

"My greatest wish in life is that someone would want me
like I want chocolate cake."

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.8. Self-deprecation

 

 "Self-deprecation" explores humor that involves making oneself the target of jokes, often highlighting personal flaws or embarrassing moments in a lighthearted way. This form of humor shows vulnerability and humility, endearing the speaker to the audience and demonstrating self-awareness. Examples include jokes about personal ineptitude in common tasks, struggles in relationships, or self-aware comments on one's own behavior or appearance. Self-deprecating humor is relatable and often seen as a sign of resilience.

 

 Making fun of oneself for humor: this style of humor involves making oneself the target of the joke, often highlighting one's own flaws, shortcomings, or embarrassing moments in a lighthearted and humorous way. It's a humble form of humor that can endear the speaker to the audience.

 Self-deprecating humor can be a way to show vulnerability and humility, often making the comedian more relatable and likeable to the audience. It demonstrates an ability to laugh at oneself, which is a sign of self-awareness and resilience.

 

 

A.3.9. Rhyme and Meter

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.9. Rhyme and Meter

 

 "Rhyme and Meter," explores how humor leverages rhyme, rhythm, and wordplay. It covers tongue-twisters and limericks as examples of whimsical wordplay, highlighting the subversion of traditional limerick structures. The chapter emphasizes that puns and humorous verses thrive on setting up rhythmic expectations and then defying them for a surprising twist, resulting in clever humor. It also touches on the use of rare and unexpected rhymes, occasionally replacing risqué rhymes with clean, non-rhyming words for comedic surprise. In essence, "Rhyme and Meter" demonstrates how language's musical elements can creatively enhance humor.

 

 Humor that uses the musicality of language, often through rhymes and rhythmic patterns, adds a whimsical and melodic element to comedy. By manipulating poetic devices, comedians and writers can turn phrases and sentences into amusing quips or verses that are pleasing to the ear and funny to the mind.

  • Tongue-twister
    "A tutor who tooted the flute
    tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
    Said the two to the tutor,
    'Is it tougher to toot,
    or to tutor two tooters to toot?'"
    This tongue-twister cleverly plays with the sounds and rhythm of the words to create a whimsical and humorous challenge.

 

 Limericks

  • "There was an old man from Peru,
    whose limericks stopped at line two."
    ...?!

    This joke cleverly subverts the traditional five-line "There was an old man from Peru..."  structure of a limerick, creating humor through unexpected brevity.

 

  • A family man from Siberia;

    As a father was very inferior;

    But one operation;

    Revised the situation;

    And now he’s Mother Superior.

     (Spike Milligan?)

 

  •  "There was an Old Man with a beard,
    Who said, 'It is just as I feared!
    Two Owls and a Hen,
    Four Larks and a Wren,
    Have all built their nests in my beard!'"

     This
    classic limerick, written by Edward Lear, a famous artist and writer known for popularizing the limerick form, perfectly encapsulates the whimsy and rhythm that characterizes these types of verses. It combines absurd imagery with the classic AABBA rhyme scheme and maintains a consistent meter throughout.

 

 

 Mathematical Limericks!

1

dozen, a gross, and a score

Plus three times the square root of four

Divided by seven

Plus five times eleven

Is nine squared and not a bit more.

 

By Leigh Mercer (1893–1977)

 

2

 

Integral z-squared dz
from 1 to the cube root of 3
times the cosine
of three pi over 9
equals log of the cube root of ‘e’.

 

"By Betsy Devine and/or Joel E. Cohen, perhaps"

(z = 'zee' (US pronunciation) or dt!)

 

 Puns and other forms of humorous verse often capitalize on the pleasure of pattern recognition and the surprise of an anticipated pattern disrupted. By setting up expectations with rhythm and rhyme and then subverting them, the humor is in the twist, which provides a little jolt of joy and cleverness.

 Rare, funny, unexpected rhymes are frequently used to create a humorous effect. Sometimes a risqué rhyme word is replaced with a clean, albeit non-rhyming word, serving as the main punchline and adding to the comedic surprise.

 

 Form and Content can interact to create the humorous effect - here a little poem by the author of this book, published at first some decades ago in German:

 

Weeks…

 

On Monday starts the week, I bet:

All work and worries' warning -

On Tuesday evening I set

My clock for Wednesday morning

 

And Thursday creeps along, and hence

A paradox: so still -

Then Friday undermines the sense

Of Goddess Freyja - till...

 

All Saturday must compensate!

All Sunday is for rest -

Horrific, how you see too late

Eternal Monday's quest...! :-)

 

hilmar alquiros

Source unknown

 

 

A.3.10. Dramatic Irony

"Humor in tragedy, that is the true test of the artist."
George Bernard Shaw

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.10. Dramatic Irony

 

  "Dramatic Irony," delves into a storytelling technique where the audience possesses critical information that characters lack, resulting in suspense or humor. It discusses various examples, such as a trapped firefighter, participation trophies, and characters boasting about honesty despite lying. The chapter extends to different mediums, including movies, plays (like Ibsen's "A Doll's House"), and novels (like Steinbeck's "Of Mice and Men"). These examples illustrate how dramatic irony can build tension and anticipation. Additional techniques, like verbal cues and layered dramatic irony, are explored. The chapter underscores how this tool enhances storytelling, creating suspense, surprise, and emotional impact by manipulating audience knowledge and expectations.

 

 When a character's actions or words have the opposite of their intended effect, known only to the audience. When the audience understands a situation that is unknown to the characters involved, creating a sense of anticipation or suspense. The audience is privy to crucial information that the characters in a story are unaware of, creating a disparity in understanding that can lead to suspense or humor.

 

Additional Techniques:

 

 

A.3.11. Verbal Irony

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.11. Verbal Irony

 

  

 

 "Verbal Irony," explores humor derived from the contrast between the literal and intended meanings of words. It presents examples like the whiskey diet quip, where the speaker humorously claims to lose time instead of weight. Another example involves a stepladder being treated as if it were a departed parent, highlighting the absurdity of attributing familial roles to inanimate objects. The chapter also features a statement about sleeping 'like a baby,' juxtaposed with the reality of frequent nighttime awakenings, creating self-deprecating humor. Verbal irony is described as a sharp and sophisticated form of comedy that demands audience engagement to appreciate the disparity between words spoken and their true meaning. The humor in verbal irony lies in its clever language use, delivering a mental 'click' when the audience grasps the underlying meaning.

 

 Literal and the intended meaning: This form of humor thrives on the gap between the literal and the intended meaning of words. It's a clever way of saying one thing and meaning another, often leading to a humorous or sardonic twist.

 Verbal irony often carries a sharpness or a clever twist, which can make the humor more impactful. It's a witty, often sophisticated form of comedy that requires the audience to think and appreciate the disparity between what is said and what is truly meant. The joy in verbal irony lies in the clever use of language and the mental ‘click’ when the listener understands the underlying meaning.

 

 

A.3.12. Paraprosdokian

 

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.3.12. Paraprosdokian

 

  "Paraprosdokian," explores a form of humor based on unexpected twists in language. Named after the Greek words for "beyond expectation," these wordplay gems surprise us by subverting common sense or familiar patterns. Paraprosdokians come in various subtypes, such as pun-based, self-deprecating, absurdist, philosophical, and sarcastic, each offering a unique style of humor. Examples include Churchill's statement on Americans and witty phrases like "War does not determine who is right – only who is left." These linguistic surprises lure us in with familiar beginnings and then deliver punch lines that twist expectations, creating humor through clever language use and wordplay.

 

 A figure of speech in which the latter part of a sentence, phrase, or larger discourse unexpectedly contra

 

"You can always count on the Americans to do the right thing – after they have tried everything else."
 Winston Churchill:
The statement begins conventionally but ends with an unexpected twist, providing humor and insight.

 

 The name comes from the Greek words "para" (beyond), "pros" (toward), and "dokēsis" (expectation), essentially meaning "beyond expectation." They often play with our assumptions and surprise us by subverting common sense or familiar patterns. They can be witty, humorous, thought-provoking, or even unsettling, depending on the intent and style.

 Ever tripped over a sentence? Not literally, of course, but stumbled on a turn of phrase that left you surprised, amused, or perhaps pondering a deeper truth? That's the magic of paraprosdokians, witty wordplay gems that twist expectations and tickle our funny bone. These mischievous little sentences are masters of disguise, luring you in with familiar beginnings before delivering a punch line that flips the script.

 

Features:

 So, how do these linguistic 'Houdinis' pull off their surprising feats? They rely on several key features:

Examples:

 

Subtypes:

Pun-Based:
These paraprosdokians combine a surprising twist with a play on words, often resulting in a groan-inducing pun.

 

Self-Deprecating:
This type poke fun at the speaker's own shortcomings or misfortunes, creating humor through self-awareness and humility.

 

Absurdist:
These ones defy logic and embrace the nonsensical, often creating a surreal and unexpected punch line.

 

Philosophical:
These paraprosdokians offer a paradoxical or thought-provoking twist, often challenging conventional wisdom or inviting reflection on deeper truths.

 

Sarcastic:
They use irony and biting wit to create a humorous effect, often expressing a critical or mocking tone.

 

 

A.4. Literature and Poetry

 

"There are two ways of writing comedy:
you can write funny things,
or you can make serious things funny."

Woody Allen

 

     Source unknown

 

A.0. Introduction

A.1. Wordplay

A.2. Situational Humor

A.3. Verbal Humor

A.4. Literature and Poetry

A.5. Physical Humor

A.6. Dark Humor

A.7. Absurd Humor

A.8. Interactive Humor

A.9. Cultural Humor

A.10. Visual Humor

A.11. Music - Symphony of Smiles

A.12. Cabaret, Comedy and Comedians

A.13. Philosophical Humor: A Chuckle with Depth

A.14. Crossover Humor: A Symphony of Laughs

 

 "Literature and Poetry - Towers of Wit!" introduces the concept of humor in literature and poetry, emphasizing the lighter side of satire before delving into political and social critique. It compares humor to an amuse-bouche, a playful prelude to the main course of satire. The chapter highlights various forms of literary humor, including satirical novels like Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" and Voltaire's "Candide," comic poetry by authors such as Ogden Nash and Shel Silverstein, and modern comic novels by writers like P.G. Wodehouse and Mark Twain.

It aims to educate and entertain readers, offering a diverse range of examples, from classic to contemporary, to illustrate how humor has been an integral part of literary expression. The chapter sets the stage for a deeper exploration of political and social satire, promising to dissect contradictions, skewer hypocrisy, and use humor as a mirror to reflect the world's flaws. It invites readers on a literary journey where humor merges with criticism, ready to explore the subversive world of satire.

 

A.4. Literature and Poetry - Towers of Wit

A.4.1. Political + Social Satire

A.4.2. Cultural Satire

A.4.3. Parody in Literature + Media

A.4.4. Witticism

A.4.5. Aphorism + Epigrams

A.4.6. Tweet

A.4.7. Anecdote

 

 Before we delve into the fiery pits of political and social satire, let's pause for a moment and savor the lighter side of the literary menu. Satire, my dear reader, is not all biting commentary and barbed quips. It can be a playful dance, a whimsical caper through the realms of absurdity, a gentle tickle of the funny bone before the full-on belly laugh of social critique.

 One simple example are 'Bitchy Comments':

  • I don’t have the energy to pretend to like you right now.

  • I may have multiple personalities but none of them like you.

  • If you want to lose weight quickly, you could always shave your legs.

 Think of it as an amuse-bouche for the main course. We have the satirical novel, where giants and miniature people become hilarious mirrors reflecting back the flaws of our own society, like in Swift's "Gulliver's Travels." Or the comic poems of Ogden Nash, where everyday life gets twisted into whimsical knots, leaving us both chuckling and musing. And who can forget the modern comic novel, where Wodehouse's witty wordplay paints hilarious portraits of the upper crust, Twain's tall tales tickle our ribs with their irreverence, and Adams's zany sci-fi sends us spiraling into galaxies of laughter?

 But fear not, dear reader, the main course awaits! Soon, we shall plunge into the spicy realm of political and social satire, where laughter becomes a weapon, a scalpel dissecting societal ills and political absurdities. But before we grab our forks and knives, let's savor these literary appetizers, appreciating the lighter touch of humor before taking a bigger bite out of the world's follies.

  • Satirical Novels:
    Works like Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" and Voltaire's "Candide."

  • Comic Poetry:
    Ogden Nash
    Shel Silversteinand Edward Lear have made significant contributions.

  • Modern Comic Novels:
    Works by authors like 
    P.G. Wodehouse, Mark Twain, and Douglas Adams.

 Our approach to this section not only educates but also entertains: inviting my appreciated readers to explore the rich landscape of humor in literature and poetry. The blend of examples, from classic to contemporary, offers a broad perspective on how humor has been and continues to be an integral part of literary expression.

 Prepare for a literary 'smorgasbord' of satire: where social skewers meet political jabs, and absurdity becomes the amuse-bouche for biting commentary. We'll dissect societal contradictions, skewer hypocrisy with wit, and leave no sacred cow unmooed (at least figuratively, unless you have some specific farm-related satire in mind…).

 So buckle up, dear reader, and grab your laughing-stock. We're about to embark on a literary journey where chuckles collide with criticism, and where humor holds up a mirror to the world, reflecting its flaws with a wink and a grin. Ready? Let's dive into the deliciously subversive world of political and social satire! :-)

 

 

A.4.1. Political + Social Satire

"Satire is tragedy rehearsed in the key of farce."
Stephen Fry

 

A.4. Literature and Poetry - Towers of Wit

A.4.1. Political + Social Satire

A.4.2. Cultural Satire

A.4.3. Parody in Literature + Media

A.4.4. Witticism

A.4.3. Aphorism + Epigrams

A.4.6. Tweet

A.4.7. Anecdote

 

"If we don't end war, war will end us."
– H. G. Wells

 

 "Political + Social Satire," explores humor's role in critiquing and exposing flaws in politics, policies, and society. It aims to provoke thought and change by using ridicule and parody. The chapter features examples, like humorously critiquing the fitness industry's unrealistic expectations, and highlights forms of satire in Borat, Animal Farm by George Orwell, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, and "The Daily Show." Additionally, it touches on limericks, a form of witty poetry with playful absurdity and wordplay. Overall, the chapter delves into humor's ability to address serious issues through satire.

 

 Political satire uses humor and exaggeration to criticize or expose flaws in political systems, policies, and societal issues. It aims to provoke thought, debate, and change by highlighting issues through ridicule and parody.

 

"My workout routine consists of watching YouTube videos of people working out."

 Satirizing the fitness industry's unrealistic expectations and obsession with appearances. Watching workout videos instead of actually exercising highlights the disconnect between aspirations and reality, often driven by marketing and social pressure.

  • Borat:
    This mockumentary film satirizes American culture and politics through the eyes of a fictional Kazakh journalist. Exaggerated stereotypes and Borat's outrageous behavior expose prejudices and social contradictions.

  • Animal Farm:
    George Orwell's novel uses allegory to satirize the rise of totalitarian regimes, with farm animals representing political figures and their actions.

  • Brave New World:
    Aldous Huxley's
     novel that satirizes the dangers of losing individuality in the pursuit of societal stability and happiness.

  • The Daily Show:
    This late-night comedy show uses satirical news segments and humor to critique current events and political figures.

  • Limericks:
     
    A classic five-line witty poem with a distinctive rhythm, often humorous and sometimes rude. 
    Nonsensical limericks: Often absurd or humorous, playful with illogical situations, wordplay, and silly rhymes: meant to be funny and absurd, not to make sense.

There once was a man from Peru,

Whose nose was so long, it turned blue.

He'd sit on a wall,

And sniff at it all,

Then proclaim, "It's the sky's finest hue!"

 

 

A.4.2. Cultural Satire

I can only remember 23 letters of the alphabet. 
I don’t know why.